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Lindsey Graham faces backlash for repeated racial innuendos

Lindsey Graham faces backlash for repeated racial innuendos
Photo via Gage Skidmore.
Lindsey Graham accused of committing 'a crime in plain sight' in desperate bid for campaign cash

With Election Day fast approaching, Sen. Lindsey Graham's (R-S.C.) is walking on the edge, constantly pushing the envelop of racial tension with his repeated, verbal innuendos and many are calling out the Republican lawmaker's disregard for the weight of his words.

New York Times-bestselling author Michael Arceneaux recently criticized Graham in an op-ed as he highlighted the danger of the senator's attempt to wave off and normalize racism. Arceneaux recalled Graham's questionable remarks during Wednesday's Supreme Court confirmation hearing of President Donald Trump's nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Graham referred to the "good old days of segregation" during the hearing and his words quickly garnered an array of responses from the American public. When asked about the remarks, Graham waved off concerns claiming his remarks were merely "sarcasm."

"It was with deep sarcasm that I suggested that some legislative body would want to yearn for the good old days of segregationism," Graham explained. "The point that I'm trying to make, there's nobody in America in the legislative arena wanting to take us back to that dark period in American history and for my opponent to suggest that says far more about him than me."

As he claimed approximately one third of his constituents are Black, Graham went a step further with another remark that has ultimately made led to more scrutiny. The Republican senator insisted he cannot understand why anyone would raise questions about him possibly being racist despite him being criticized for words he uttered.

Graham said, "In terms of that statement, it blows my mind that any rational person could believe that about me."

Arceneaux went on to explain why Graham's remarks, and his response, are problematic.

"Lindsey Graham is a southern white man in his 60s. Spare me this nonsense. And if he's too busy begging for spare change to deal with his challenger's massive fundraising haul, he should have asked a campaign staffer to give him a few notes about the history of policing, the state of South Carolina, and the current data about police brutality." - Michael Arceneaux

According to Arceneaux, Graham appears as an out-of-touch politician unaware of what is occurring in America outside of his own bubble.

"Lindsey Graham not only feels it's okay to "sarcastically" reference segregation and the Jim Crow era, but that it's irrational for anyone to take offense to such trivializing," Arceneaux wrote, adding, "The other problem with Graham's mindlessness when discussing racism is that it extends beyond this quip."

Although Graham has waved off criticism, he has expressed concern about the campaign success of his Democratic opponent, Jaime Harrison. Not only is Graham facing challenges financially, his recent remarks have also raised concerns about the outcome of the Congressional race.

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