Michael Cohen abruptly returned to prison after his early release

Michael Cohen abruptly returned to prison after his early release
Image via Shutterstock.

Former personal attorney to President Donald Trump Michael Cohen, known as a “fixer,” was surprisingly taken back into custody by federal authorities just hours after the Supreme Court ruled against the President in a case sparked in part by Cohen’s own testimony before Congress.


Cohen had been sent home from jail in response to concerns over the coronavirus pandemic, but his sentence was not commuted and he allegedly was not to leave the house. He was photographed while dining at a Manhattan French restaurant, Le Bilboquet. Legal experts days ago noted he was risking being returned to jail for possibly violating terms of his release from prison.

The former Trump attorney “was taken into custody by U.S. Marshals and sent to a federal jail after balking at a demand that he agree not to talk to the media, or participate with any film or book, while serving the rest of his criminal sentence on home confinement, his attorney said,” according to CNBC.

“Cohen, his wife, Laura, and another couple spent about an hour chatting before they became the last patrons to leave around 11:30 p.m.,” the NY Post had reported.

“Do you think we need to review [President Trump’s] financial statements and his tax returns?” Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) had asked Trump’s “fixer” back in February.

“Yes, and you’d find it at the Trump Org,” Cohen replied.

Cohen Thursday afternoon had visited a federal court house to sign papers related to his house arrest, and possibly be fitted with an ankle monitor, his attorney said, according to MSNBC. That’s when federal marshals, without prior warning, remanded him back into custody.

Experts say they were not surprised he was sent back to a federal jail, after being seen in town and also tweeting.

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