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Listen: MyPillow CEO claims Twitter was 'running' his account after suspending him in off-the-rails interview

Mike Lindell, the pro-Trump founder and CEO of My Pillow who falsely claims Trump won re-election got permanently booted off Twitter Tuesday night for spreading lies about the election, but in an off-the-rails interview on WABC radio Wednesday Lindell claimed that Twitter was "running" his account days earlier, the first time he was suspended.

"Well I've been fighting Jack Dorsey and Twitter and Facebook and you wouldn't believe that about two weeks ago, or three weeks ago when I, when they had that new evidence of the [voting] machine fraud, I put that up on Twitter," Lindell told the "Bernie & Sid" show.

(There was no voting machine fraud.)

"Now they took my Twitter down there for about seven or about 12 hours, when it came down I put it up again. And this time, I want everyone to listen to this, they took my Twitter, or they took me off of Twitter, but they left my account up there and they were running it, they, they were, they were running it, was, my friends are going, 'Mike, Are you on, are you still up on Twitter?' I go, 'yeah but I can't control it,' they were liking things and and tagging things that weren't me that's where my friends."

"They would retweet things under my name. And they would retweet things so they wouldn't type things under, but they and then I tried to take stuff down, and I got a letter from Twitter Germany, I said, or was the email, and it said, 'You are not allowed to take this down. Penal Code 601 of the Twitter code,' I said, 'what is going on?"

Less than two weeks ago the internet exploded when Lindell was photographed walking into the White House with notes that appeared to mention "martial law" and the "Insurrection Act."

Listen:


Federal prosecutors and former senior DOJ officials agree: Video evidence is damning against Trump

Online news outlet Just Security, which focuses on 'rigorous analysis of law, rights, and U.S. national security policy,' has created an intense 10-minute compilation splicing together video clips from events leading up to the Capitol insurrection alongside Donald Trump's speech to the mob before they marched to and into the Capitol.

Using videos that were created and uploaded by users of the gutter of right-wing social media dumpster Parler (before the FBI lights came on and users started to scramble), the events of Jan. 6 are becoming clearer. The original video was collected by ProPublica and made available to the public, and Just Security was able to create more context for Donald Trump's speech, using the crowd responses. Set chronologically, the video is a damning piece of evidence that could and should be used in the impeachment trial of the twice-impeached former president. It shows the crowd reacting in real-time to Donald Trump's calls to "fight" for him at the Capitol, as well as whipping the crowd into a white-hot frenzy toward his own vice president.

Just Security reporters Ryan Goodman and Justin Hendrix interviewed numerous "former senior Justice Department officials and former federal prosecutors" to get their takes on the video compilation and the result is a roadmap into the possible second impeachment of Donald Trump.

The video begins with footage of Donald Trump speaking to the Jan. 6 Stop the Steal crowd, highlighting his claims that "We will never give up. We will never concede. You don't concede when there is theft involved," and "We want to be so nice. We want to be so respectful of everybody, including bad people."

Video of the crowd obtained from Parler shows people yelling and cheering, and responding to Trump's call to action by yelling things like "Storm the Capitol," "Invade the Capitol building," and "Take the Capitol." Calling the "left" of the United States, "ruthless," Trump continuously called on then-Vice President Mike Pence to "do what's right for the Constitution and the country."

Trump hits the war and fighting metaphor again, saying that "Now it is up to Congress to confront this egregious assault on our democracy," and how the Stop The Steal folks will now march down to the Capitol building and make themselves a herd heard. The video then pivots to the march down to the Capitol building, showing charlatan luminaries like InfoWars' Alex Jones telling the crowd to go to the "other side of the Capitol building," where he claims Trump will be.

Later, the video shows a crowd at the door of the Capitol building chanting "We want Pence," over and over again. It's not a bunch of people calling for Mike Pence to speak—that's something that's never happened in America, frankly. A man inside of the Capitol building is videotaped talking into a landline phone in the building, asking for Speaker Pelosi and Mike Pence, saying "We are coming for you, bitch!"

Other video taped next to scaffolding erected at the Capitol building shows a guy speaking into a megaphone, saying he hopes Mike Pence goes to the "gallows," and that he would like to see him in front of a "firing squad." I wonder why Mike Pence didn't come out to nod paternalistically at the MAGA supporters, like he has for the past four years?

Video inside of the Capitol building hallways shows big bearded faketriots screaming at D.C. and Capitol police, telling them that "You're outnumbered. There's a million of us out there, and we are listening to Donald Trump—your boss."

The chant of "Fight for Trump" continues.

At 4:17 PM that day, after hours of inaction, Trump released his weak sauce Twitter video, once again calling the election "fraudulent," but telling his supporters to go home. This is followed by video of Mr. QAnon Narcissistic Mascot Jacob Chansley saying that Trump told them to go home and that the rioters had "won the day," because it had sent the message they would remove officials from office "one way or another" if they didn't overturn the results of the election—or whatever demands they come up with, I guess?

Finally, they cut in MAGA acolytes like Texas realtor Jenna Ryan, who chartered a private jet to go and storm the Capitol building. After first telling people she hadn't gone in the building, only to have her own footage and a lot of other footage show that she was lying, the video has a local news interview with her saying that she thought she was following Trump's instructions. She was, but that's still a crime.

Former Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York Elie Honig tells Just Security that "The House impeachment managers should consider rolling this tape as their final exhibit at the trial. It shows, clearly and viscerally, how President Trump's words in fact incited the insurrectionist mob — particularly when taken in combination with Trump's own tweet, after the riot, praising the mob as 'great patriots' who should 'remember this day forever.'"

Former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania and former Deputy Assistant Attorney General Harry Litman disagrees with Honig on strategy, but not on how damning this all is:

From a legal standpoint, a prosecutor in a case charging Trump with seditious conspiracy would play this tape in an opening, and then say, "Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, the evidence will show that the insurrectionists came to Washington that day because they believed the President had called them there to do their patriotic duty; once there, the President worked them into a demented rage, telling them they had to fight like hell, and that he would be there with them at the Capitol. They went with blood in their eyes screaming 'Fight for Trump!,' threatening the lives of Nancy Pelosi and Mike Pence, and proceeded to storm and lay waste to the Capitol, the sanctum of our democracy, all while President Trump viewed the bedlam with delight from his safe perch back at the White House. They were criminals and deserved to be punished; but any fair-minded person will see from this evidence and more that we will bring forward that it was the President who lit the match and threw it on the fire because he wanted – and at a minimum reasonably foresaw – that they would become an out-of-control mob."

In lieu of real evidence of fraud, the Trump administration and its surrogates—and those wanting to make some last-minute money off the MAGA crowds—promoted the idea that the entire election of Joe Biden over Donald Trump was rigged. In every form of media, at every opportunity, they told millions of Americans that not only were their suspicions of problematic votes cast, but that in fact, a coordinated effort to overthrow the "landslide" victory of Donald Trump was underway.

You can argue that the people who believe the things that Donald Trump says are being conned. They are. You can say they truly believed that their attempt to force Congress to throw out millions of American votes was just and constitutional. You can say all of those things because Donald Trump, the president of the United States, told them exactly that. Other elected officials, including senators, told them it was true.

The fact of the matter is that Trump's guilt is very easily verified. He purposely misled his supporters and then attempted to have them illegally overthrow our government. The only defense the MAGA insurrectionists being arrested right now have amounts to an insanity plea. They believed the government was out to get them and they needed to violently defend themselves because they believed they were about to be hurt by magic. It's not a worthwhile defense in most of their cases, and hopefully, they can watch from a jail cell's closed-captioned television set as their fearful leader and liar is convicted of crimes against our Constitution and the Executive office of our country.


Georgia Republican actually faces consequence from state general assembly for refusing COVID-19 test

As of the publishing of this story, Georgia has 722,062 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Georgia is passing 12,000 confirmed deaths due to COVID-19, with more than 48,498 Georgians being admitted to the hospital because of the virus. Over 8,000 people have ended up in intensive care units across the Peach State. Like most places throughout the United States, the pandemic is very much not under control. Like many places in the country, the reason for this is bad leadership combined with a federal government response that was terrible from the start. Republican operators promoting bad science and attacking public health and safety measures has also eroded the efficacy of public health departments across the country's advice.

Joe Ripley of 11 Alive News reports that Republican Rep. David Clark of Buford, Georgia, was escorted out of the state Capitol chambers Tuesday morning for refusing to take a COVID-19 test. This is a part of a set of protocols established by house leadership along with advice from the health department. Ripley, in video after being escorted out, said Clark hadn't wanted to make a big deal about everything, and then proceeded to make a big deal about everything: "I even told leadership over two weeks ago, and last night, let's not make it a big deal, can we talk about this, I'm not trying to make it an issue, I'm not trying to make it political." What exactly Clark expected his fellow human beings to do, stuck in a small space with an asshole that frequently doesn't wear a mask and refuses to take a COVID-19 test, is not clear. Republicans with piss-poor health habits have put various lawmakers health in jeopardy time and time again due to similar selfish stances.

Well, radio news anchor Rahul Bali reports that Clark just lost his office space across the street from the state Capitol. This of course, is a temporary measure, and will be remedied if Clark wants to be a big boy and "participate in safety protocols and not put other members and staff in harm's way."

Clark told reporters that his big problem was that, "I check my temperature when I come in, I go in the chambers, I wear my mask, I follow the protocols that they want in the chamber. But two tests a week is wrong, on my conscious, when teachers can't get it and first responders can't get it. We get two tests when nobody else gets the same thing out there. My grandma doesn't get two tests." The idea that Clark's test was taking away from his grandma is idiotic. If his grandma is practicing proper social distancing and public safety protections she will hopefully never need to get a COVID-19 test.

Clark seems to have been protesting a memo sent by Speaker Ralston that outlined the new health and safety protocols for the 2021 legislative session. Sidenote: there's a global pandemic going on.

During the 2021 Session, Georgia Tech will be operating a testing site for General Assembly Members and Capitol Staff. The test that Georgia Tech will be using is a saliva-based PCR test (no nasal swab required) and is intended for asymptomatic individuals only. (In the event that a Member or House staff is symptomatic, they should not report to the Capitol to be tested, but rather should seek out a test off-site. If a Member or House staff has difficulty finding a testing site with availability, they should contact the Office of the Speaker for assistance.) [...]
All Members and House staff will be required to be tested twice weekly during the 2021 Session. House staff must begin testing the week prior to session. All Members shall be tested prior the beginning of the 2021 Session at the testing location of their choosing. In the event that a Member wishes to be tested at the Capitol prior to Session beginning, they should make plans to be at the Capitol between 7:00 AM and 11:00 AM on either Tuesday, January 5, or Thursday, January 7.

Speaker Ralston released a statement saying that "the member in question had been advised numerous times about the requirements and had refused to be tested at any point during this session." It's not about Clark's feelings it's "about preventing the spread of a disease that has killed more than 12,000 Georgians."

Gov. Brian Kemp was asked during a press conference today about Clark's removal from the state House, and tried to walk a circular tightrope of logic in the hopes of not offending the indefensible position of Clark. "I don't really know a whole lot about that but I know that Speaker Ralston and the House leadership has worked with their members and worked with Dr. Tumi's team to set up protocols to be able to keep this building safe during this session." He went on to say that his office also had a testing protocol and everyone should follow the "best practices," and test protocols set up. This is rich coming from a governor who has very directly helped exacerbate the pandemic in his state, for similar choices of political whimsy over good policy.

Gov. Kemp and his new tune.


Gov. Kemp responds to Georgia legislator removed from House for refusing COVID-19 test youtu.be

The 'Republican Party is imploding before our very eyes': Analyst says McConnell is digging his own grave

Speaking on MSNBC Tuesday, "The Circus'" Alex Wagner said that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would weaponize the Senate gym if he was able to do it.

She explained that while the country is facing a slate of challenges, "we're dealing with a Republican Party that's imploding before our very eyes. We talk about the fact that Mitch McConnell be is trying to weaponize an organizing resolution. Everybody should take a moment and absorb that. This is the organizing resolution is a pro forma piece of Senate parliamentary procedure. Mitch McConnell tried to weaponize it. That, to me, indicates the Republican Party will leave no stone unturned in terms of the levers of power. If they could weaponize the Senate gym, they would. Anything that there is, they will try to use as a lever of power because they understand they are dealing with an administration and a Democratic Party that is emboldened, that is scared for the future of the country and that is willing to do a lot of really big things to save what I think they see as the country on a precipice."

Wagner didn't say it but public opinion alone is working against the GOP. President Joe Biden enjoys a 66 percent job approval according to Gallup, while former President Donald Trump left office with the lowest polling of his presidency at 34 percent.

The argument over the parliamentary procedure is about the filibuster, which Mitch McConnell wants to preserve and many Democrats oppose because it has stopped majority rule in the Senate, which is outlined in the Constitution. The founding documents outline a simple majority of Senators to pass legislation, but due to the threat of a filibuster, a super-majority of 60 votes is needed to pass any legislation. It was a tactic used during the Jim Crow era to block Civil Rights legislation and it has been employed by McConnell over the past decade to stop the Senate from passing bills.

Host Ari Melber said that McConnell admitted in public that he would use whatever obstruction tactics available to him to stop the Democrats from passing any legislation.

"It's completely counterintuitive," Wagner said. "Mitch McConnell doesn't want anybody to do away with the filibuster because it's the one tool he has. It is a very, very effective tool the way the Republicans have used it. He's virtually guaranteeing the Democrats are brought to the edge of getting rid of the filibuster because his tactics to preserve it are so willfully wrong if you will. I mean, it is so plainly obvious what he -- he's laying out his agenda of obstruction and hoping that the Democrats don't fight. I think honestly if you had asked me a week ago whether there was momentum within the Democratic Party to get rid of the filibuster, the antics of the past few days have almost ensured there is going to be a real groundswell of consensus inside the Democratic caucus to do something about the filibuster because of McConnell's behavior over the last couple of days."

See the video below:

McConnell is digging his own political grave www.youtube.com

How Fox News is now defending QAnon

Supporters of the far-right QAnon conspiracy cult were among the extremists who violently stormed the U.S. Capitol Building on Jan. 6, inspiring national security experts to voice concerns about QAnon possibly making inroads in the military and law enforcement. But some pundits at Fox News, including Laura Ingraham and Tucker Carlson, don't view QAnon as a threat and are now defending the movement by equating criticism of QAnon with attacks on free speech.

Carlson, during one of his angry rants on Tuesday night, mocked the idea that QAnon is dangerous.

"The real threat is a forbidden idea," Carlson said mockingly. "It's something called QAnon."

Carlson went on to show a collage of cable news clips describing QAnon's extremism before suggesting that those attacking QAnon are promoting "tyranny."

"No democratic government can ever tell you what to think," Carlson told viewers. "Your mind belongs to you. It is yours and yours alone."

This was a non-sequitur. The clips he had showed included media figures sharing fears and concerns about the belief system, not a call for the government to "tell you what to think."

Carlson went on to denounce QAnon critics as a "mob of censors, hysterics and Jacobin destroyers, all working on behalf of entrenched power to take total control of everything."

In a rant of her own, Ingraham showed a clip of Jen Psaki — the new White House press secretary under President Joe Biden — telling reporters that the National Security Council will try to determine "how the government can share information" on efforts to "prevent radicalization" and "disrupt violent extremist networks." And Ingraham tried to spin Psaki's announcement not as an effort to prevent domestic terrorism, but as a crackdown on conservatives in general.

"Republicans need to step up in unison and demand that the Defense Department and the Biden administration clearly define what they think constitutes extremism," Ingraham declared. "Now, if a member of the military voted for Trump, does that make him an extremist? Now, what if someone complains on Facebook that the federal government wastes a lot of money? Is she an extremist? What if they say that Roe v. Wade should be overturned? Or what if they participate in the March for Life?"

Ingraham continued, "What if they're conservative Baptists — they believe that sex outside of marriage is immoral? Is that extremist? What if they have guns at home and they're lifetime NRA members? Will they now be considered extremists or even terrorists? We deserve to know. You see where this is destined to lead. And it is certainly not to a freer and more united America."

By suggesting there's no way to target the threat from violent extremist ideologies like QAnon without targeting other conventional conservatives, Ingraham, too, offered more cover for the conspiracist movement.

Democrats unveil bill to raise the minimum wage to $15/hour — with the party's full support

Demanding an end to the "starvation wage" of $7.25 that has prevailed at the national level since 2009, a group of top House and Senate lawmakers on Tuesday introduced legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025—a move that would hike the pay of an estimated 32 million workers across the United States.

Led by Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in the House and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) in the Senate, the Raise the Wage Act of 2021 (pdf) would phase in the $15 hourly minimum wage over the next four years and index it to median wage growth thereafter.

The bill, which has the backing of both House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), would also gradually phase out the sub-minimum wage for tipped workers, teen workers, and workers with disabilities, ensuring that those workers are paid at least the full federal minimum wage.

Sanders, the incoming chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, said during a press call Tuesday that while he would prefer to implement the $15-an-hour floor more quickly, the legislation as is would "improve life substantially for millions and millions of workers."

"No person in America can make it on $8, $10, or $12 an hour," Sanders said in a statement. "In the United States of America a job must lift workers out of poverty, not keep them in it. We must raise the minimum wage to a living wage—at least $15 an hour."

"We can no longer tolerate millions of workers not being able to afford to feed their families or pay the rent," the Vermont senator added. "The time for talk is over. No more excuses. It is time for Congress to act to raise the minimum wage to at least $15 an hour."

While cities and states across the nation have hiked their minimum wages in recent years in response to tireless advocacy by the grassroots Fight for $15 movement, the federal minimum wage has been stagnant for more than a decade, the longest stretch without an increase since the minimum wage was enshrined into law in 1938.

"As a longtime organizer for working people who helped draft the resolution that made Seattle the first major city to enact a $15 minimum wage, I know that raising the wage is good for workers, families, businesses, and the economy," said Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. "It is time for the People's House to once again stand up for workers, fight for families, and pass the Raise the Wage Act so we finally have a $15 minimum wage all across America."

The Democrat-controlled House passed an earlier version of the Raise the Wage Act in July of 2019, but the then-Republican-controlled Senate refused to allow a vote on the measure.

During Tuesday's press call, Sanders expressed confidence that with Democratic control of the House, the Senate, and the presidency, the Raise the Wage Act finally has a strong chance of becoming law. The Vermont senator added that he is working on a plan to structure the minimum wage increase so it can clear the Senate through the budget reconciliation process, which is filibuster-proof and thus requires just a simple-majority vote.

"Do I think we have 50 votes plus one [from Vice President Kamala Harris] to pass a $15-an-hour minimum wage? I absolutely believe that we do," said the Vermont senator.

In a statement Tuesday, Ben Zipperer of the Economic Policy Institute said that the Raise the Wage Act of 2021 is "not just moral policy, it is also good economics."

"A $15 minimum wage by 2025 would generate $107 billion in higher wages for workers," said Zipperer. "Raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025 will help reduce poverty, narrow racial and gender pay gaps, and stimulate the economy. Minimum wage workers deserve a raise. Now is the time for Congress to give it to them."

Watch: Dr. Fauci takes down Fox News host who accuses him of 'aggressiveness' toward Trump

Dr. Anthony Fauci on Tuesday scolded a Fox News host who tried to grill him on his alleged "aggressiveness" toward former President Donald Trump.

The confrontation came during an interview on Fox News with hosts Bill Hemmer and Dana Perino.

At one point in the interview, Perino noted that Fauci had complained about his former boss to The New York Times.

"I know that those questions are irresistible for reporters to ask," Perino admitted. "But is there a law of diminishing returns to continue to answer the questions about that relationship if the crisis is as acute as you say?"

"I agree with you, Dana," Fauci replied. "After that interview, I said to myself, we've really got to look forward and ahead and just put that behind us. I totally agree with you. So looking forward, I'm really not enthusiastic at all about reexamining what happened back then rather than looking forward to what we need to do now."

"That's a fair answer," Hemmer interrupted, inserting himself into the interview.

"I heard a lot of interviews with you over the weekend," the Fox News host continued. "It just seems like there's this aggressiveness toward the Trump administration -- I mean, you're the most respected man in America on this topic. Why do you even feel the obligation to answer these questions?"

"And when you were at the White House, no one prevented you from talking," Hemmer added. "Did they?"

"No, that's why I got into trouble," Fauci revealed.

"What do you mean?" Hemmer pressed.

"Well it wasn't happy about some of the things that I said," Fauci said before observing that Hemmer was trying to force him to answer the very types of questions that he was being criticized for entertaining.

"Again, we're getting in to rehashing it again," the doctor pointed out. "I think we should do what Dana just suggested. Namely, put that behind us and take a look at the problems we have ahead."

Hemmer responded by retreating from his question.

"At 9:37 on this Tuesday morning, January 26th, we will mark this moment," Hemmer said. "I'm ready to move on with you as well."

Watch the video below from Fox News.


Dr. Fauci takes down Fox News host who accuses him of 'aggressiveness' toward Trump youtu.be

'That's huge!': Chuck Schumer thrills activists with surprise push for Biden to declare climate emergency

Advocates for bold climate action welcomed Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's remarks late Monday calling for President Joe Biden to declare a climate emergency.

"That's huge!" tweeted Dallas Goldtooth, the Keep It In The Ground campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network. It "would allow the president to take significant steps to confront climate chaos."

The New York Democrat's comment came Monday evening in an interview with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow.

"I think it might be a good idea for President Biden to call a climate emergency," said Schumer. "Then he can do many, many things under the emergency powers of the president that he could do... without legislation."

"Now, Trump used this emergency for a stupid wall, which wasn't an emergency. But if ever there was an emergency, climate is one," Schumer said.

Schumer reiterated the suggestion in a Monday night tweet, stating unequivocally that "Biden should declare a national emergency on the climate crisis."

Water protector Joye Braun, a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, joined the chorus of cheers, tweeting, "Holey macaroni!!! SCHUMER says declare climate emergency... ok who said dem prayers?"

Author and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben suggested the Biden's demand was evidence of the climate movement's impact.

"When we shift the zeitgeist, we shift what's politically possible, and what's politically necessary. Keep it up, everybody!" McKibben tweeted Tuesday.

That take was mirrored by youth climate leader and Earth Uprising International founder Alexandria Villaseñor, who said the remark was a sign Schumer was "keeping the promise he made to me and our entire generation."

The comment is "incredible" and a sign of a "tectonic shift," said Sunrise Movement co-founder and political director Evan Weber, who, like environmental policy expert Dr. Leah Stokes, welcomed Schumer saying that his legislative policy priorities are climate, racial and economic inequality, and democracy reform.

A coalition of climate groups including the Center for Biological Diversity has already drafted an executive order for Biden to be a "climate president," with action including the declaration of a climate emergency.

Recent polling indicates a majority of the U.S. public would back that action.

A Yale Program on Climate Change Communication survey from December found that 56% of voters would support a president "declaring a national emergency to act on global warming," with 84% of Democratic voters backing such an action.

That support is also clear from Green New Deal champion Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), who tweeted Tuesday, "We've got to recognize the climate crisis for what it is: an existential threat to life on Earth."

"I'm glad Sen. Schumer agrees that we must meet this emergency with a bold vision, transform our economy, and fight for justice in every step we take," Markey said.

But not all Democratic lawmakers are on board.

Sunrise's Weber, in his tweet, pointed to the need for Schumer to have a plan to not only "bypass GOP obstruction" in advancing climate and other priorities but also tackle pushback from Democratic senators like Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, whose opposition to eliminating the legislative filibuster enraged progressive Democrats.

"As Senate majority leader, he'll be judged by his results, not just his positions," Weber added.

'Whacko' Nikki Haley blasted as 'terrorist sympathizer' for claiming 'no basis for impeachment’

Former President Donald Trump's former Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, is being strongly criticized after telling Fox News, "I don't even think there's a basis for impeachment." Trump incited the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol that resulted in five deaths, including the killing of a police officer. At least 134 law enforcement officers were assaulted during the attempted coup. And a majority of voters, 52%, blame Trump for the attack.

But according to Haley, Trump deserves "a break," and those who support conviction in his Senate trial should instead just "move on."

Trump's seditious actions after the election "were not great," Haley conceded to Fox News' Laura Ingraham Monday night, despite Trump literally lying for months to the American people so much that the vast majority of Republicans falsely think Democrats stole the election.

For the first time in American history, there was not a peaceful transfer of power, and yet Haley say Trump "absolutely" does not deserve to be impeached.

And she is playing the GOP's hand, attacking Democrats with President Joe Biden's call for unity.

"Now they're going to turn around and bring about impeachment yet they say they're for unity," she whines, insisting Americans' demands for accountability in the wake of Trump's insurrection are "only dividing our country."


Haley was destroyed on social media.





























There are witnesses who can testify that Trump enjoyed watching MAGA riots: NYT's Haberman

Former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial is scheduled to begin in the United States Senate next month, and New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman believes that there are witnesses who could make things significantly more uncomfortable for Republicans.

Appearing on CNN Tuesday, Haberman reiterated that her own sources have said they personally saw Trump enjoying watching his supporters riot at the United States Capitol building on January 6th.

"He was watching, enjoying what he was seeing in part because he was enjoying just people defending him and in part because... it stopped the certification [of Biden's election]," she said. "That was what he wanted to see."

Haberman would not reveal any of her sources, but she speculated that Democrats could track some of them down and call them as witnesses at the president's Senate trial if they wanted to do so.

"I think if witnesses are called for this trial, I don't know that they will be, but if witnesses are called for this trial, I suspect they can find some people who they might be able to try to get to talk about this," she said.

Trump has been impeached in the House of Representatives for inciting an insurrection at the Capitol building while Congress was working to certify the results of the 2020 election.

Watch the video below.


There are witnesses who can testify that Trump enjoyed watching MAGA riots: NYT's Haberman youtu.be

Global politics expert explains why it’s so hard to ‘deprogram’ Trumpian conspiracy theorists

The word "deprogramming" is typically used in connection with extremist religious cults such as the Unification Church, the Tony & Susan Alamo Christian Foundation or Jim Jones' the People's Temple, but cults can be political as well — for example, the QAnon movement. Political science expert Brian Klaas, in a Washington Post op-ed published on January 25, lays out some reasons why it is so difficult to "deprogram" Americans who have embraced far-right political cults and outlandish conspiracy theories.

"For the past four years, the United States was governed by a conspiracy theorist in chief," explains Klaas, who teaches global politics at University College London. "Whether by retweeting QAnon accounts from the Oval Office or painting himself as the victim of shadowy 'deep state' plots at rallies, President Donald Trump injected the toxin of baseless conspiratorial thinking straight into America's political bloodstream. On January 6, America saw how far that venom had spread as a ragtag group of militias, racist extremists and flag-waving disciples of Trumpism stormed the Capitol."

The January 6 "insurrectionists," Klaas adds, had certain things in common: they were "unified by their support for Trump" and were also "conspiracy theorists."

"There is no doubt: the United States has a serious problem with pathological political delusions," Klaas warns. "So, do we have any hope of deprogramming the millions of Americans who are devoted to dangerous lunacy? Don't hold your breath….. Once people have gone far enough down the rabbit hole of conspiratorial thinking, it can be nearly impossible to get them back out."

Klaas goes on to list some reasons why it is so difficult to "deprogram" conspiracy theorists. According to Klaas, "First, conspiracy theorists are far more likely to have a Manichaean worldview, meaning they interpret everything as a battle between good and evil….. Second, those who seek to debunk conspiracy theories are precisely the people that true believers distrust…. Third, these organized mass delusions are designed to resist debunking."

There's a joke among critics of far-right conspiracy theorist and radio host Alex Jones that goes something like this: what did the Alex Jones listener say when told that there is no New World Order? The listener said, "Yeah, that's what the New World Order wants you to think." It's a joke, but it speaks to one of the important points Klaas makes in his op-ed — that when someone pushes back against conspiracy theorists, they sometimes respond by digging in even more.

A variety of media outlets, from CNN and MSNBC to Mother Jones and The Nation, have been relentless when it comes to debunking the far-right conspiracy theories that came from the Trump Administration and its sycophants. But Klaas notes that "if someone believes the media is controlled by sinister but unseen puppet masters, fact- checks from CNN will never convince them they're wrong."

"For the past four years," Klaas notes, "those who have worked hardest to dispel QAnon believers of their fantasies are the very people that 'Anons' trust least: anti-Trump academics like me, news outlets such as the Post and politicians who they believe to be co-opted by the 'deep state.' Political scientists Brendan Nyhan and Jason Reifler have documented the risks of a backfire effect, in which correcting misperceptions actually ends up entrenching them. In the world of conspiratorial thinking, the harder the pushback, the greater the proof that a coverup is afoot."

According to Klaas, the "rise of social media" has made it much easier for far-right conspiracy theorists to live in a bubble.

"Bowling alone has been replaced by tweeting together — a cardboard cutout for real social interaction, but one that has a seductive allure to millions of people," Klaas warns. "Many of the fanatics who stormed the Capitol were neither poor nor social misfits, but rather, had found a digital community to augment or replace their offline one. We can no longer pretend that conspiracy theorists are beneath our attention. They've shown they have tremendous capacity to inflict damage on society."

Klaas discussed his Post op-ed during a January 26 appearance on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." Watch the video below:

'Coalition Of Reality' Needed To Combat Conspiracy Theories, Says Writer | Morning Joe | MSNBC www.youtube.com