Daniel Villarreal

Donald Trump spent $3 million on Wisconsin recount — only for Joe Biden to gain 132 more votes

The re-election campaign of soon-to-be-former President Donald Trump spent $3 million for a recount of votes in Wisconsin in the hopes of throwing out tens of thousands of absentee and early ballots cast in support of President-elect Joe Biden.

But Trump's $3 million dollar gambit hasn't paid off. In fact, it actually increased Biden's lead over him by 132 votes. As Slate explains, Trump was specifically asking for recounts in Dane and Milwaukee Counties, two Democratic strongholds where Biden beat Trump by over 360,000 votes total.

"By the end of the recount in Milwaukee County, Biden's total had increased by 257 votes, from 317,270 to 317,527. Trump also saw an increase in votes, boosting his total by 125 votes to 134,482," Slate wrote, showing how Biden ended up even further ahead. The new votes were originally excluded from the county's total due to "human error."

"In Dane County, Trump has gained 68 votes over Biden but the recount there isn't expected to finish until Sunday," Slate continued. The state is expected to certify its election results on Tuesday, December 1.

On Tuesday, Republicans filed a lawsuit not only asking the Wisconsin Supreme Court to stop the certification of the presidential election results, but also aiming to grant the power to name presidential electors to the state's Republican-controlled Legislature, the Associated Press reported. But if Trump's over 30 failed lawsuits seeking to overturn the election are any indication, this one won't be any more successful.

The lawsuit was filed by Erick Kaardal, an attorney and former Minnesota Republican Party official, who filed as a representative of a conservative group called the Wisconsin Voters Alliance. He filed the suit on behalf of the organization and several Republican voters. He also led an unsuccessful lawsuit before the election to get rapper Kanye West on the ballot.

Is a conservative coffee company supporting 'Kenosha killer' Kyle Rittenhouse?

Lin Wood, the lawyer of Kyle Rittenhouse – the man who shot two protestors to death on August 25 during a racial justice uprising in Kenosha, Wisconsin — posted a tweet announcing Rittenhouse's recent release on bail. The tweet includes an image of Rittenhouse wearing a shirt advertising Black Rifle Coffee, a conservative coffee company that has advertised on right-wing podcasts.

While a spokesperson for Black Rifle Coffee told The New Civil Rights Movement that it does not sponsor legal advocacy efforts and does not have a relationship with Kyle Rittenhouse, the question raised several important issues to do with those supporting the shooter.

The image led Sleeping Giants, a watchdog group that alerts advertisers of their connections to far-right rhetoric, to question whether the company supports the young murderer. In their tweet, Sleeping Giants showed an image recently posted by right-wing podcaster Elijah Schafer touting the coffee company, which also advertises on his podcast.


The question is particularly salient considering that Rittenhouse recently had his $2 million bail paid in part by Mike Lindell, the conservative CEO of the American company MyPillow, a regular Fox News advertiser, and right-leaning actor Ricky Schroeder.

Rittenhouse has been charged with first-degree intentional homicide, first-degree reckless homicide, attempted first-degree intentional homicide and other charges for the murders of Joseph Rosenbaum, 36, and Anthony Huber, 26, on August 25.

Here's why people are worried Donald Trump will resign before Joe Biden takes office in January

An opinion columnist at The Hill has predicted that after pardoning people in his inner circle, "Trump will resign from the presidency before his term officially ends, and he will be pardoned by Vice President Pence, when Pence becomes president."

Columnist Brent Budowsky explains, "A presidential pardon by Pence would not offer protection from cases originating in states, but those cases will be far more manageable if they are not sunk into a morass of federal cases that only a federal pardon can protect him from."

Without a federal pardon, Budowsky continues, Trump will almost certainly spend his coming years stuck in federal cases that not only threaten his freedom, but also his ability to secure lucrative multibillion-dollar business deals capitalizing off of his presidency and media savvy.

However, Trump would remain on the hook for criminal investigations on the state level.


Texas GOP asks state Supreme Court to trash over 117,000 votes

A Texas Republican legislator and three other GOP members have asked the state Supreme Court to throw out over 117,000 votes collected in drive-thru early voting centers in Harris County, a state Democratic stronghold.

The Republicans allege that the centers violate state laws requiring voters to submit their own ballots and that the expansion of drive-thru voting sites in Harris County "amounts to an illegal expansion of curbside voting," according to Forbes.

A Texas Republican legislator and three other GOP members have asked the state Supreme Court to throw out over 117,000 votes collected in drive-thru early voting centers in Harris County, a state Democratic stronghold.

The Republicans allege that the centers violate state laws requiring voters to submit their own ballots and that the expansion of drive-thru voting sites in Harris County "amounts to an illegal expansion of curbside voting," according to Forbes.

Democrats believe that Texas has enough Democratic voters to possibly turn the state blue. As such, it's no wonder that state Governor Greg Abbott got the state Supreme Court to approve of his last-minute plan to restrict drop-off ballot boxes to just one per county, regardless of each county's size or population.

Democratic voters are largely expected to vote early and use drop-off voting to help avoid contracting COVID-19 at in-person polling places on Election Day.

This Democrat is beating his GOP opponent — so the right-wing is lying about him dressing up as Hitler

Arizona senatorial candidate Mark Kelly is currently beating his Republican challenger Martha McSally by about 5 percentage points. So a right-wing media outlet decided to try and take Kelly down by posting a photo and lying about him dressing up as Nazi leader Adolf Hitler during his school days at the Merchant Marine Academy.

On Friday, the right-wing website the National File shared photographic "proof" that Kelley had dressed as Hitler, and the post quickly went viral. But Kelly's former classmates Jennifer Boykin, Peter Lindsey, Mark Baden and Ed McDonald have all said that the image isn't of Kelly.

Lindsey in particular said someone contacted him with the image via the professional social network LinkedIn asked "and asked if the person in the costume was Mark Kelly. I told them no, and want to say again, Mark is not in those photos. I have spoken to numerous classmates about this evening, and they concur that he is not in any of these pictures. The people spreading these lies should stop."

"The person who reached out to Lindsey was identified by the campaign as a paid consultant for a super political action committee aligned with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-K.Y., that is spending millions of dollars to help defeat Kelly," AZCentral.com reports.

Every second another American gets COVID, as 100,000 new daily cases are predicted by election

On Friday, the U.S. reported its highest ever daily toll of new COVID-19 cases with 83,948 new cases, according to Reuters. Considering that there are 86,400 seconds in a day, that means that almost every second, a U.S. resident comes down with a new case of COVID-19, according to New York Times correspondent Mike Baker.

Meanwhile, Dr. Angela Rasumussen, a virologist at Columbia University, has predicted that the U.S. will likely have its highest-ever daily count of newly confirmed cases by Election Day with around 100,000 new cases in a single day.


As of October 23, an average of 800 U.S. residents are dying of COVID-19 each week and nationwide there are currently 41,000 hospitalizations related to the ongoing pandemic, reports The Guardian.

At the third and final debate last Thursday, Republican President Donald Trump said we're "rounding the corner" on the epidemic, meaning that we're improving towards sustainable change. There are no indicators that is actually happening. In fact, at a rally on Friday, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden quipped, "As many as 210,000 avoidable deaths, and there's not much he would do differently? If this is a success, what's a failure look like?"

In fact, multiple pandemic experts, including Dr. Anthont Fauci of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said cases are likely to rise even higher during the cold winter months as people cluster indoors and meet for fall and winter holidays.

As of October 23, the U.S. has had over 8,535,200 confirmed COVID-19 cases and over 223,900 related deaths. The epidemic has now killed more Americans than were killed in the U.S. military conflicts in Vietnam, Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan and World War I combined.

While Trump has promised that a vaccine will appear in a few weeks, Dr. Fauci has said that a majority of Americans won't have access to it until deep into 2021

An agency Trump created just debunked his lies about 'massive' mail-in voting fraud

For months, Republican President Donald Trump has been crowing about how expanding mail-in voting during a pandemic will create widespread voter fraud, even though there's no evidence supporting this. And the head of an agency Trump created just contradicted Trump's bogus claims as well.

Christopher Krebs, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), said on Friday, "I have confidence that your vote is secure, that state and local election officials across this country are working day in and day out, 24/7, that the 2020 election is as secure as possible." He added that "bad guys" are trying to "sow chaos, sow doubt" about the election's integrity.

Krebs and CISA are actually directly responsible for "monitoring the election amid the inevitable voting glitches and delays," according to Edge Media.

On Thursday, Krebs said the tens of millions of votes already cast by mail and early voting have shown no signs of any foreign interference either.

Court smacks down Trump attempt to intimidate Pennsylvania voters

At a Friday night rally, Republican President Donald Trump talked about his attempts to have "poll watchers" in the swing state of Pennsylvania, an attempt that a local court recently ruled as illegal.

"I think we're leading everywhere," Trump said at the rally. "We think in Pennsylvania doing great. We got to be very careful Philadelphia. They play games in Philadelphia, and they won't let us watch the count in Philadelphia… So we're watching Philadelphia."

Trump then told his White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to "please watch Philadelphia … because I don't like what I'm hearing about Philadelphia…. I don't like what I see going on in terms of what's gone on over the past, and probably what's going on. Think of it. They fought like hell that we can't watch them. Count the vote, what's wrong with watching? why can't we have poll watchers? And so we're in court right now poll watches in Philadelphia. But we're doing great in Pennsylvania, gotta watch Philadelphia."



First off, the so-called poll watchers are needless seeing as there's zero evidence of voter fraud at polling places, so Trump's "watchers" are little more than intimidators meant to make Democratic voters nervous.

Second off, it's not Meadows' job to handle poll monitoring, election monitors or lawsuits. The White House Chief of staff serves as a "liaison among members of the President's cabinet and the White House [and is] is responsible for directing, managing and overseeing all policy development, daily operations, and staff activities for the President."

Third off, on Friday, local Judge Gary Glazer ruled that the Trump campaign's attempt to have poll-watchers at the state polls isn't allowed under state law. The Trump campaign had sent unauthorized poll watchers into satellite poll offices where local election officials register voters and help people fill out their mail-in ballots, but the officials kicked the watchers out.

Trump said his watcher should be allowed to monitor such offices, but a bipartisan Philadelphia City Commission said that the satellite locations don't qualify as official polling stations and therefore don't qualify as a place allowed by state law to have poll watchers. Judge Glazer agreed.

On September 27, Politico wrote that Trump had hired dozens of lawyers from three major law firms and recruited thousands of volunteer attorneys to contest election results in 17 key states considered vital to his re-election.

In response, Biden campaign spokesperson Michael Gwin told the publication, "The Biden campaign has assembled the biggest voter protection program in history to ensure the election runs smoothly and to combat any attempt by Donald Trump to create fear and confusion with our voting system, or interfere in the democratic process."

'Dr. Johnny Bananas': The White House is pushing a fraudulent medical petition to let COVID-19 run rampant

Having basically surrendered to the coronavirus, Republican President Donald Trump has increasingly said that he'd like to stop focusing on COVID-19 prevention measures and instead go for "herd immunity." The White House is even backing a petition signed by thousands of doctors around the world who support the idea.

The only problem: Many of the petition's signers are fake, using names like "Dr. I.P. Freely, Dr. Person Fakename and Dr. Johnny Bananas," according to TruthOut.org.

Herd immunity is a term often applied to widespread vaccine use, in this case means "allowing the virus to spread in the general population … so that allowing those least likely to be killed by the virus to return to normal life" while protecting those most vulnerable to the virus' lethality.

While that might sound appealing, the Trump administration has shown how poorly it protects the most vulnerable—the lack of a national prevention strategy, widespread affordable testing, and Trump's refusal to use the Defense Production Act to get manufacturers to make widely available personal protective equipment (PPE) for frontline healthcare workers are just its most glaring failures.


To promote the idea, which Trump has repeatedly mentioned on the campaign trail, the White House has shared a petitioned called The Great Barrington Declaration, promoting the idea. However, anyone can sign the petition and declare themselves as a doctor, including people who work as massage therapists, psychotherapists and homeopaths, a practice with no proven medical benefits.

Furthermore, on Monday, World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called the herd immunity strategy "scientifically and ethically problematic" because scientists don't know enough about how much immunity a person gains after catching COVID-19 and how long it lasts, especially since some people have been infected by the virus more than once.

"Letting the virus circulate unchecked therefore means allowing unnecessary infections, suffering and death," he said.

Lindsey Graham says Black people are safe in South Carolina — if they’re conservative

On Friday night, Republican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham debated his Democratic challenger Jamie Harrison virtually because Graham refused to submit to a COVID-19 test.

As a result, both Graham and Harrison were separately asked debate questions. And on a question about whether he'd met with leaders of the Black Lives Matter Movement, Graham said in part, "I care about everybody. If you're a young African-American, an immigrant, you can go anywhere in this state, you just need to be conservative, not liberal."

The context of Graham's horrid sound bite was that anyone can have a safe and secure political career in the state regardless of skin color as long as they're conservative. "You can be an African-American and go to the Senate, you just have to share the values of our state," he said earlier in his response, but his aforementioned closing line seemed to make the Black female moderator stammer as she moved onto the next question.


Graham's response almost sounded like he was saying if you're white, you'll be completely okay in the state, but if you're Black or from another country, you'll only be okay if you're conservative like him.

Of course, being conservative or pro-police doesn't magically protect Black people from being harassed or killed, no matter what state you live in.

Twitter users weren't impressed with Graham's creepy answer:











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