'Such a shock': Fox News host is flabbergasted when confronted with the disturbing facts about COVID-19 in kids

'Such a shock': Fox News host is flabbergasted when confronted with the disturbing facts about COVID-19 in kids

Monday morning on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends,” co-host Ainsley Earhardt discussed the coronavirus crisis and the threat it poses to children with Dr. Natasha Kathuria — an emergency physician in Austin, Texas. Earhardt told Kathuria she had been under the impression that COVID-19 didn’t pose a major threat to kids — and Kathuria schooled the “Fox & Friends” co-host on how dire a threat coronavirus can be when children are infected.


Noting a report that more than 97,000 children had tested positive for COVID-19 in the second half of July, Earhardt told  Kathuria, “We’re all worried about sending our kids back to school. What is that going to look like for our country, and for our elderly grandparents and things like that? 97,000 kids have tested positive. We all — that was such a shock to me, because I had heard kids really don’t get it. If they do, they’re all going to be OK.”

Kathuria explained, “You know, that was just in two weeks — so about 100,000 new cases in pediatric kids just in two weeks. And I can guarantee you that number is actually much higher.”

The emergency doctor went on to explain that kids who have been infected with COVID-19 but aren’t showing any symptoms can easily infect older Americans.

“We don’t really test kids that often,” Kathuria noted. “They’re usually asymptomatic, they have very mild symptoms — but they’re still shedding this virus. So, that is going to artificially be low no matter how good we are about testing right now. So, you know, that’s what we’re worried about right now, is sending these kids to schools and sending them home. And it’s not the kids so much we’re concerned about — obviously, we are — but it’s their grandparents, their parents, when their parents then go to work, who they’re spreading this to.”

Earhardt asked Kathuria if children infected with COVID-19 are experiencing “minimal side effects” — to which the doctor responded, “So, that’s the majority of them. The likelihood of death and the likelihood of critical illness is lower, but it’s possible. I mean, a seven-year-old just died in Georgia, with no medical problems. We hear about this, and we see it all the time. Kids get sick, they get multisystem inflammatory syndrome from this. They can get ill from this; the likelihood is just lower. So, they’re not immune to this. They definitely can fall ill.”

Enjoy this piece?

… then let us make a small request. AlterNet’s journalists work tirelessly to counter the traditional corporate media narrative. We’re here seven days a week, 365 days a year. And we’re proud to say that we’ve been bringing you the real, unfiltered news for 20 years—longer than any other progressive news site on the Internet.

It’s through the generosity of our supporters that we’re able to share with you all the underreported news you need to know. Independent journalism is increasingly imperiled; ads alone can’t pay our bills. AlterNet counts on readers like you to support our coverage. Did you enjoy content from David Cay Johnston, Common Dreams, Raw Story and Robert Reich? Opinion from Salon and Jim Hightower? Analysis by The Conversation? Then join the hundreds of readers who have supported AlterNet this year.

Every reader contribution, whatever the amount, makes a tremendous difference. Help ensure AlterNet remains independent long into the future. Support progressive journalism with a one-time contribution to AlterNet, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you. Click here to donate by check.

Close
alternet logo

Tough Times

Demand honest news. Help support AlterNet and our mission to keep you informed during this crisis.