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Attorney for Giuliani associate facing campaign finance charges delivers 'trove' of impeachment documents to House Intelligence Committee

On Monday, attorney Joseph A. Bondy made an announcement concerning his client, Lev Parnas — an associate of Rudy Giuliani (President Donald Trump’s personal attorney and former mayor of New York City) who is facing federal campaign finance charges: Parnas-related communications, Bondy announced, have been handed over to Rep. Adam Schiff and the House Intelligence Committee, which Schiff chairs.


The communications, according to Law & Crime reporter Matt Naham, include text messages, WhatsApp messages and photos.

Monday on Twitter, Bondy announced, “After our trip to DC, we worked through the night providing a trove of Lev Parnas’ WhatsApp messages, text messages & images — not under protective order — to #HPSCI, detailing interactions with a number of individuals relevant to the impeachment inquiry.”

That Monday tweet follows a separate Bondy tweet posted on Sunday, when the attorney wrote, “We brought the contents of Lev Parnas’ iPhone 11 to HPSCI today, despite every stumbling block placed in our path since @DOJ SDNY arrested him on 10/9/19. #LetLevSpeak #LevRemembers.”

Parnas is facing campaign finance charges thanks for federal prosecutors for the Southern District of New York (SDNY). In October, Parnas was arrested along with another Giuliani associate, Igor Fruman — and both Parnas and Fruman pled “not guilty” to campaign finance violations.

U.S. District Judge Paul Oetken recently granted Parnas’ request to give iPhone records and other documents to the House Intelligence Committee. Bondy wrote, “These materials fall within the scope of the September 30, 2019 letter request and October 10, 2019 subpoena of the United States House of Representatives’ Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI), in connection with the presidential impeachment inquiry.”

Bondy continued, “At present, we do not know whether we intend to produce the entirety of the materials, or a subset filtered for either privilege or relevancy. If a subset, we will inform the court and government as to what we have actually have produced.”

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