Russ Belville

Why Does the NCAA Test Athletes for Marijuana More Stringently Than US Soldiers or Airline Pilots?

Prior to their shellacking at the hands of The Ohio State University in the College Football National Championship Game, the fans of the Oregon Ducks were rocked by the pre-game suspension of star wide receiver Darren Carrington for failing an NCAA-administered drug test due to marijuana metabolites.  But what most fans don’t know is that had Carrington been a soldier, airline pilot, or Olympic athlete, it’s entirely possible he wouldn’t have failed their drug tests, since college athletics maintains the lowest threshold for testing positive for marijuana compared to almost all sports and, for that matter, industry.

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5 WTF Marijuana Moments of 2014

It was a banner year for marijuana in politics, with market legalization in Oregon and Alaska, personal legalization in Washington DC and South Portland, Maine, decriminalization in two New Mexico counties and six Michigan cities, and medical marijuana in Guam and Florida (which would have passed in any other state, but Florida required a 60 percent vote).

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Feds Raid Colorado Marijuana Suppliers

On Tuesday, agents from the DEA were assisted by Denver Police in raiding multiple locations throughout the city involved in the cultivation of marijuana.

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State Department's Top Drug Warrior Seeks to Loosen Drug Control Rules

“How could I, a representative of the government of the United States of America, be intolerant of a government that permits any experimentation with legalization of marijuana if two of the 50 states of the United States of America have chosen to walk down that road?”

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1 in 20 Afghans Use Drugs Despite Expensive U.S. Efforts to Eradicate Drug Crops

It is estimated that the war-torn country of Afghanistan produces 80 percent of the world’s opium supply—5,500 tons in 2013. After twelve years of the United States’ invasion of the landlocked Asian nation, a recent study shows that one in 20 Afghans is using drugs, primarily opium and cannabis, despite massive U.S. spending to eradicate drug crops.

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House Voted (Twice) to Allow Marijuana Banking Services

In a stunning change of tone on marijuana policy on Capitol Hill, the House of Representatives voted on a pair of measures affecting the legal marijuana businesses in Washington and Colorado and medical marijuana businesses in 23 states and Washington DC. Almost all Democrats were joined by a growing faction of Republicans in approving the access to legitimate banking services. The House also quashed an attempt to stop the Department of Treasury from allowing banks to do business with legal marijuana firms.

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Can Marijuana Kill Your Dog?

As marijuana becomes more of a mainstream topic, the news media is finding new ways to sensationalize their coverage. One topic that has resurfaced lately is dogs and marijuana—specifically, is pot good or bad for them? There is a lot of misinformation out there about canines and cannabis, leading NBC News to report “Marijuana poisoning on the rise in pets.”

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Terrible Idea: Lawmakers Are Abandoning Medical Marijuana Bills For CBD-Only Bills

The following originally appeared in High Times

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Legal Weed Is Now a Legitimate Business, But Banks Are Still Acting Cagey About Handling the Money

Retailers in Colorado began selling marijuana to any adult 21 or older New Year's Day, but most still lack the basic banking services used by every other legal business in the state. Industry experts fear this leaves the burgeoning marijuana industry vulnerable to the potential robberies, tax-evasion, wage theft, and money laundering that plague some cash-only businesses.

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Law Enforcers to Use Underage Kids to Sting Marijuana Shops

Underage stings, a common tactic in alcohol law enforcement, will be used to police newly legal marijuana in Washington State, according to a report from the Seattle TimesThe Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB), tasked by Initiative 502 (I-502) with the enforcement of marijuana regulations, will employ 18-, 19- and 20-year-olds to enter the state’s legal pot shops, once they are operational, and attempt to buy marijuana.

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