Michael Arria

Trump’s Hometown Teaches a Lesson in How to Resist His Workplace Immigration Crackdown

During the early morning hours of January 10, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents raided 98 7-Eleven convenience stores across the United States, demanding that managers provide paperwork for their employees. ICE ultimately arrested 21 workers, but publicly declared that they were just getting started. “This is what we’re gearing up for this year, and what you’re going to see more and more of is these large-scale compliance inspections, just for starters,” acting head of ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations Derek Benner told the Associated Press. “It’s not going to be limited to large companies or any particular industry, big medium and small. It’s going to be inclusive of everything that we see out there.”

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Workplace Bullying Affects Nearly Half of U.S. Workers

Many are hoping that 2017 represented a turning point in the fight against workplace harassment, as the #MeToo moment put a spotlight on sexual misconduct. Now some labor advocates are hoping that the momentum of #MeToo helps to fuel an additional campaign against a different and overlapping type of harassment: workplace bullying.

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Florida Prisoners Are Preparing to Strike Against Unpaid Labor

People incarcerated throughout the state of Florida are planning a January 15 work stoppage to protest their conditions, and they say they are prepared to continue the protest for more than a month.

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This Florida Stealth Offensive Against Unions Could Preview GOP Onslaught in 2018

Florida Republicans are pushing a bill designed to deal the state’s unions a death blow. House Bill 25, which was introduced by Longwood state Rep. Scott Plakon, would decertify any union in which 50 percent of the workers don’t pay dues, thus preventing them from being able to collectively bargain. Despite the fact that unions negotiate for the benefit of all their workers, no employee is forced to pay dues in Florida, because it’s a “Right to Work” state.

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White House Press Secretary Strongly Suggests Trump Will Push Through Dakota Access Pipeline

During a press conference Monday, White Press Secretary Sean Spicer heavily implied that President Trump would overturn the permit denial that is prohibiting a pipeline from being built through the Standing Rock Reservation in the Dakotas.

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British Companies Are Using a Tracking Device That Monitors Their Workers' Voices, Steps and Stress Levels

At least four British companies are using a device to track details about their workers, reports the New York Times. Currently participation in the program is voluntary, but 90 percent of the employees have asked to be included.

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Brutal Austerity Is Coming to a Statehouse Near You

The incoming Trump administration understandably frightens liberals, but right-wing successes at a state level would have moved forward regardless of who won the election. Only four states currently have a Democratic governor and a Democratic state legislature. What's more, bipartisan support for policies of austerity and neoliberalism have led to vast social spending cuts across the country regardless of political affiliation.

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Former Microsoft Employees Who Say They Were Forced to Watch Videos of Child Abuse, Sexual Assault and Murder, Sue the Company Claiming PTSD

Two former Microsoft employees say they developed post-traumatic stress disorder after being forced to watch videos of child abuse, murder and sexual assault, according to a lawsuit filed by Henry Soto and Greg Blauert on December 30. '

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Home Depot May Be Pulled Back Into a Lawsuit Over an Employee's Grisly Murder

The mother of a pregnant woman who was murdered and then sexually assaulted by her former manager sued Home Depot and Grand Flower Growers Inc, one of the retail giant's flower suppliers, in 2014. In April 2016 the lawsuit was dismissed by a federal judge in Illinois, but the Federal Seventh Circuit is now questioning the district court’s ruling that the employer couldn't have known the killing would take place.

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Trump Isn't President Yet, But the War Over Medicaid Has Already Begun

This past Christmas the New York Times ran an op-ed by Gene B. Sperling, the former director of the National Economic Council, on the GOP’s war against Medicaid. Sperling explained how Democrats are preparing themselves for a battle with Republicans over Medicare, but how a focus on that program “may inadvertently assist the quieter war on Medicaid,” a war that is much more certain.

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