Michael Arria

Trump’s Hometown Teaches a Lesson in How to Resist His Workplace Immigration Crackdown

During the early morning hours of January 10, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents raided 98 7-Eleven convenience stores across the United States, demanding that managers provide paperwork for their employees. ICE ultimately arrested 21 workers, but publicly declared that they were just getting started. “This is what we’re gearing up for this year, and what you’re going to see more and more of is these large-scale compliance inspections, just for starters,” acting head of ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations Derek Benner told the Associated Press. “It’s not going to be limited to large companies or any particular industry, big medium and small. It’s going to be inclusive of everything that we see out there.”

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Workplace Bullying Affects Nearly Half of U.S. Workers

Many are hoping that 2017 represented a turning point in the fight against workplace harassment, as the #MeToo moment put a spotlight on sexual misconduct. Now some labor advocates are hoping that the momentum of #MeToo helps to fuel an additional campaign against a different and overlapping type of harassment: workplace bullying.

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Florida Prisoners Are Preparing to Strike Against Unpaid Labor

People incarcerated throughout the state of Florida are planning a January 15 work stoppage to protest their conditions, and they say they are prepared to continue the protest for more than a month.

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This Florida Stealth Offensive Against Unions Could Preview GOP Onslaught in 2018

Florida Republicans are pushing a bill designed to deal the state’s unions a death blow. House Bill 25, which was introduced by Longwood state Rep. Scott Plakon, would decertify any union in which 50 percent of the workers don’t pay dues, thus preventing them from being able to collectively bargain. Despite the fact that unions negotiate for the benefit of all their workers, no employee is forced to pay dues in Florida, because it’s a “Right to Work” state.

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White House Press Secretary Strongly Suggests Trump Will Push Through Dakota Access Pipeline

During a press conference Monday, White Press Secretary Sean Spicer heavily implied that President Trump would overturn the permit denial that is prohibiting a pipeline from being built through the Standing Rock Reservation in the Dakotas.

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British Companies Are Using a Tracking Device That Monitors Their Workers' Voices, Steps and Stress Levels

At least four British companies are using a device to track details about their workers, reports the New York Times. Currently participation in the program is voluntary, but 90 percent of the employees have asked to be included.

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Brutal Austerity Is Coming to a Statehouse Near You

The incoming Trump administration understandably frightens liberals, but right-wing successes at a state level would have moved forward regardless of who won the election. Only four states currently have a Democratic governor and a Democratic state legislature. What's more, bipartisan support for policies of austerity and neoliberalism have led to vast social spending cuts across the country regardless of political affiliation.

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Former Microsoft Employees Who Say They Were Forced to Watch Videos of Child Abuse, Sexual Assault and Murder, Sue the Company Claiming PTSD

Two former Microsoft employees say they developed post-traumatic stress disorder after being forced to watch videos of child abuse, murder and sexual assault, according to a lawsuit filed by Henry Soto and Greg Blauert on December 30. '

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Home Depot May Be Pulled Back Into a Lawsuit Over an Employee's Grisly Murder

The mother of a pregnant woman who was murdered and then sexually assaulted by her former manager sued Home Depot and Grand Flower Growers Inc, one of the retail giant's flower suppliers, in 2014. In April 2016 the lawsuit was dismissed by a federal judge in Illinois, but the Federal Seventh Circuit is now questioning the district court’s ruling that the employer couldn't have known the killing would take place.

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Trump Isn't President Yet, But the War Over Medicaid Has Already Begun

This past Christmas the New York Times ran an op-ed by Gene B. Sperling, the former director of the National Economic Council, on the GOP’s war against Medicaid. Sperling explained how Democrats are preparing themselves for a battle with Republicans over Medicare, but how a focus on that program “may inadvertently assist the quieter war on Medicaid,” a war that is much more certain.

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One of the Reasons Republicans Hate Food Stamps? It Helps Democrats Win Elections

Food stamp spending has declined for the last two years, with 13.7% of the population currently using the program compared to a high of 14.9% in 2013, but that hasn’t stopped the GOP from looking to cut billions from the program. Many believe that the Democrats making a robust defense of food stamps would be politically unwise, but a new paper suggests this assumption might be incorrect.

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Trump's Transition Team Is Considering Privatizing the Department of Veterans Affairs

Donald Trump’s transition team recently announced that it was contemplating whether to privatize the Department of Veterans Affairs. Such a move would allow veterans to skip treatment at VA hospitals and give them funds to attend private-sector facilities instead.

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Former Employee Sues Google, Claims It Maintained an Internal Spy Network That Encouraged Workers to Snitch on Each Other

Tech news site the Information reports that a former Google employee is suing the company, claiming it maintained an internal spying program that encouraged workers to rat each other out.

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If Obama Had Prosecuted Goldman Sachs' Brain Trust, We Wouldn't Be Plagued by Them Again in Trump's Cabinet

In September of this year Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren sent a letter to Michael E. Horowitz, the Inspector General of the Department of Justice, requesting an investigation into why the Obama administration failed to prosecute any Wall Street executives after the financial crash. Warren's letter pointed to findings by Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission (FCIC), which had provided the Justice Department with 25 cases for potential prosecution. The department neglected to take on any of these cases.

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Will Trump Privatize Air Traffic Control?

In November Pennsylvania Rep. Bill Shuster, head of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, told the Associated Press that he had met with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss the possibility of privatizing air traffic control,

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United Airlines Announces Charges for Overhead Bin Use Just as It Rolls Out New Perks for Wealthy Travelers

United Airlines will soon start charging some customers for overhead bin use as part of its "new tier" ticket called Basic Economy, which allows passengers to bring one small carry-on item on board, but charges a fee ($25 for the first checked bag) for anything that needs to be stored in a bin.

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Right-Wing Shock-Jock Michael Savage Being Sued by Godfather of Conspiracy Theory Radio for Implying He Married Underage Woman

Late-night radio host Art Bell is suing controversial right-wing commentator Michael Savage for defamation, claiming that Savage insinuated Bell's wife was a 10-year-old sex worker during the September 25 episode of his "Savage Nation" radio program.

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BREAKING: Army Says Dakota Access Pipeline Will Not Go Through Standing Rock

The Army Corps of Engineers has announced that federal officials will deny final permits for the Dakota Access Pipeline to pass through the Standing Rock reservation. The decision, which is being celebrated as a huge win for protesters, coincides with the announcement that the Corps will conduct an environmental impact review of the pipeline to determine whether there are other places to route it.

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13 Top Theories for How Trump Won and Why Clinton Lost: What's Your Theory?

It’s now three weeks since Donald Trump won the presidential election, and people are still reeling. In an election that shocked the world and scrambled people’s sense of reality, Trump did what millions thought impossible: he was—sort of—elected president of the United States. True, if the U.S. were like the rest of the world, the person who got the most votes—Hillary Clinton, with in this case over 2.5 million more—would be the next president. And also true, the shenanigans, voter repression, disenfranchisement and perhaps worse that accompanied this election, mean that Donald Trump starts his term having very little legitimacy in the eyes of millions.

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What Jobs Have the Highest Rates of Suicide in the United States?

An Amazon worker was recently injured in a suicide attempt after he jumped off a company building in Seattle. Bloomberg reported that the employee had been put on a "performance improvement plan" after asking for a department transfer. As Gawker has reported, these performance plans, or PIPs, are invasive corporate tools that generally signal an upcoming termination.

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Trump Treasury Pick Steve Mnuchin's Bank Foreclosed on a 90-Year-Old Woman's House Over a 27-Cent Error

Politico is reporting that Steve Mnuchin's bank foreclosed on the house of a 90-year-old Florida woman on account of a 27-cent error.

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Trump's Latest Cabinet Pick Sets Up a Conflict-of-Interest Extraordinaire

President-elect Donald Trump has chosen Elaine Chao as his transportation secretary. Chao served as secretary of labor from 2001 to 2009, under President George W. Bush. She is the wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

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Amazon Worker Jumps off Building After Being Put on Big-Brother-Like 'Performance Improvement Plan'

An Amazon worker was injured in a suicide attempt after jumping off a 12-story company building in Seattle, reports Bloomberg.

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10 Major Companies That Don't Allow Their Employees to Take Thanksgiving Off

Minimum wage protests are taking place in 340 cities next week, launched in response to the election of Donald Trump. “Just because the election went a certain way, doesn’t mean we’re going away,” Kendall Fells, organizing director of the Fight for $15, told The Hill, "It’s the exact opposite."

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Here's What We Know About That Email Mike Pence Is Fighting so Hard to Prevent You From Seeing

The election might be over, but email controversies could stick around for a while. The Indianapolis Star has reported that incoming Vice President Mike Pence is fighting to keep an email from a political ally private. If that seems ironic given the endless insinuations about Hillary Clinton's email server, that's because it is.

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Wal-Mart Tells Its Workers Not to Download App Created by Labor Group Advocating For Higher Pay

Wal-Mart is telling its employees not to download a new smartphone app designed by OUR Walmart, a labor group that organizes for workers to receive higher pay and other benefits. The Android app allows Wal-Mart workers to communicate about workplace policies and employee rights. The Wall Street Journal reports that Wal-Mart has instructed its store managers to tell their employees that the app is a scheme created to obtain personal information.

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McDonalds is Suing the City of Florence for $20 Million Because It Won't Let Them Open an Outlet

The global fast-food chain McDonald’s is suing the city of Florence after it rejected the company's proposal to open an outlet in the city's historic Piazza del Duomo.

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10 Progressive Wins That Were Obscured by Trump's Shocking Victory

There's a good chance you're currently experiencing one of the five stages of grief now that Donald Trump has been elected president. However, if you're anywhere near the final stage, a rundown of some progressive victories from last night might cheer you up just a little.

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Why Is Tennessee's Government Refusing to Release Sexual Harassment Data on Its Members?

In September, the Tennessee legislature voted to oust Jeremy Durham, a GOP state representative who has been accused of sexual misconduct with at least 22 women, yet the state won't release sexual harassment data on any other Tennessee lawmakers.

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Apple is Being Sued For Violating Labor Laws...And the Trial Could Impact Over 20,000 People

2017 marks the tenth anniversary of the iPhone and rumors about the capabilities of the products's next incarnation have already captivated certain segments of the internet. However, Apple enthusiasts might be unaware of a lawsuit filed against the company that just hit court last month. The allegations involve thousands of people, including many who might not even realize that they're of the legal battle.

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Should a Politician's Block List from Twitter Be Public Knowledge?

Does the public have a right to see every tweet a lawmaker sends out? What about the people the politician chooses to block on social media? Those questions are at the heart of a complaint filed in Miami Beach, Florida.

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