Colorlines.com

4 Things to Watch for in Season 2 of ‘Orange is the New Black’

The following was originally published on Colorlines.com. Reprinted with permission.

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The Great Isolation of the 1%

This article originally appeared on Colorlines.com, and is reprinted here with their permission.

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Whatever Happened to Comprehensive Immigration Reform in 2013?

The following was originally published on Colorlines.com. Reprinted with permission.

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The Devastating Effect of Mass School Closures on Philadelphia

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‘Fruitvale Station’ Is More Than a Movie, It’s Become a Landmark

When audiences see actor Michael B. Jordan get pulled off the BART train in “Fruitvale Station,” they’ll see the dramatized last moments of Oscar Grant’s life, filmed at the actual station where BART police officer Johannes Mehserle killed him on New Year’s Eve 2009. The feature film premieres nationally on July 12 to plenty of early buzz and rave reviews for director Ryan Coogler’s debut effort, and for performances from actors like Jordan and Academy Award winner Octavia Spencer, who plays Grant’s mother. But for many in the Bay Area who lived through Grant’s death and the national outrage that followed, the real-life sets will be just as arresting. 

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School Police and Principals Forced to Undergo Trainings in Implicit Racism

Already home to one of the most progressive school discipline policies in the country, Denver has set out to best even its own record. On Tuesday, Denver Public Schools and local and county police departments inked a five-year agreement specifically designed to limit student interaction with the juvenile justice system. The agreement offers a rare example of a school system that is bucking the national trend toward criminalizing student misbehavior.

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Florida’s School-to-Prison Pipeline is Largest in the Nation

Reprinted with permission of Colorlines.com. For more news from a racial justice perspective, sign up to receive weekly Colorlines Direct.

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The Shocking Details of a Mississippi School-to-Prison Pipeline

Reprinted with permission of Colorlines.com. For more news from a racial justice perspective, sign up to receive weekly Colorlines Direct.

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Are For-Profit Colleges the Answer for Black Students?

Reprinted with permission of Colorlines.com. For more news from a racial justice perspective, sign up to receive weekly Colorlines Direct.

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For People of Color, Paul Ryan May Be Even Worse Than Romney

Reprinted with permission of Colorlines.com. For more news from a racial justice perspective, sign up to receive weekly Colorlines Direct.

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5 Wildly Destructive Myths About Crime and Race

Reprinted with permission of Colorlines.com. For more news from a racial justice perspective, sign up to receive weekly Colorlines Direct.

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Parent Trigger Laws Stir Controversy from Coast to Coast

On two coasts, furious debates are brewing over a controversial new school reform policy aimed at leveraging the power of parents to improve struggling schools.The parent trigger, as it’s called, invites furious debate wherever it goes. But it’s not going away anytime soon.

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Why is Hollywood So Afraid of Black Women?

 It’s Oscar season! Actually, the Oscars aren’t until the end of February, so we’ve got another few weeks of hype and speculation and scathing critical analysis. Fun stuff!

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On Baby Blue Ivy Carter and the Alleged Ugliness of Blackness

 Besides reading straight news stories and some of Jorge Rivas’s Beyonce Baby Absurdities, I’ve avoided most things Blue Ivy Carter. I knew if indulged in even a smidgen more about this little girl, I’d find myself walking among stunted souls who traffic in the idea that the full lips, large eyes, broad nose and dark brown skin of a Jay-Z is inherently ugly. 

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NYPD Cop Taped Making Racial Slur About Black Man After Stop-and-Frisk

A New York City Police officer has been charged with a federal civil rights violation after prosecutors said he used a racial slur while bragging that he had falsely charged a black man with resisting arrest. The man was detained last spring in Staten Island as part of the department’s controversial stop-and-frisk policy.

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Arizona Steps Up Harsh Immigration Policy with Operation Desert Sky

Arizona might be giving the anti-immigrant attacks a rest in its legislature, but out on the streets not much has changed. On Tuesday Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio announced the launch of “Operation Desert Sky,” an airborne version of his controversial crime sweeps. This time he wants to send 30 pilots into the air with M-16s and a .50-caliber machine gun so they can intercept people trying to cross the border.

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We Must Make Room for Racial Justice in the People Power Exploding Around Us

Over the last few weeks I see a certain poetry in two movements that have emerged: one to save Troy Davis, and end the death penalty. And another to control corporations, especially those of the financial industry, with Occupy Wall Street. The first speaks to social control, the latter to economic control—two sides of the same coin.

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How Investing in Medicaid Will Create Jobs

 As a follower of debates around health care policy, I often feel as if I’m watching three blind mice fumble about, trying to identify this enormous behemoth in their midst. 

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The Horrific Labor Practices Behind Your iPhone

The world’s largest electronics manufacturer, Foxconn Technology Group, has a plan for ending the grisly run of worker suicides that have drawn it unwanted attention over the past two years: replace human workers with one million robots. It seems the best way to interrupt rising global outrage over worker abuse in iPhone factories is to just get rid of the workers.

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2 Big Lies About Immigration Disproved in One Alabama Town

 Russellville is a small town in northwest Alabama, the kind of place that most people who grew up an hour’s drive away don’t even know exists. Even by Alabama standards, folks in Russellville take their football seriously. Though the town only has about 10,000 residents, a few years ago its high school became the first in the state to purchase a Jumbotron video screen, at a cost of more than a quarter million dollars.

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How California Law Shields Violent Police Officers

This story was produced with the support of the Investigative Fund of the Nation Institute and the Investigative Reporting Program at UC-Berkeley.

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More Jail Time Than the Man Who Killed Her Son? The Criminalization of Black Mothers

Raquel Nelson, who was convicted of second-degree vehicular manslaughter after her four-year-old son was killed by a drunk driver, will not be going to jail after all. On Tuesday a judge sentenced Nelson to 12 months of probation and 40 hours of community service, and offered her a new trial, which she’s since decided to pursue. She faced three years in prison.

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Inmate Health Dwindles as Prison Hunger Strike Enters Fourth Week

More than 400 inmates at four California prisons are entering their fourth week of a hunger strike to protest long stays in isolation cells that they contend are cruel and inhumane.

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Disaster Capitalism is Failing Displaced Haitians

From the balcony of her second story Port-au-Prince apartment, Mary Ander had a particularly good view of former U.S. President Bill Clinton’s tour last week of Haiti’s soon-to-be-launched “Building Back Better Communities” housing expo, a Haitian Ministry of Tourism competition that will result in the contracting of hundreds of new housing units for Haiti’s post-earthquake reconstruction.

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Palestinian Youth Channel an Old Struggle Through New Media

 On the last day of class, we’re unplugging the media revolution. The last session of my social media training program at An Najah University, in the city of Nablus in the West Bank, has been sabotaged by a campus-wide Internet outage, a scheduling mishap that left the students locked out of the computer lab, and a general lethargy afflicting summer-session students in the oppressive summer heat.

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White Men Impersonating Lesbian Bloggers Want Everything But Burdens

In the media business, we frequently use the maxim “three makes a trend.” So far I haven’t heard about another white heterosexual man passing as, say, a Syrian lesbian or deaf lesbian mother of two, but I’m sure one will emerge in the next 10 minutes. In the meantime—for you folks who have been too busy being a member of a systematically oppressed group—allow me to recap.

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Not Everyone Loves Oprah

After 25 years on the air, Oprah’s very last episode of her daily talk show is airing today. It is the end of an era for a show that’s redefined media and transformed television. And I for one am not going to miss Oprah Winfrey at all.

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NAACP Faces Boycott Over Kid Rock Honor

There’s an uproar brewing in Detroit. And this one isn’t related to school test scores. Some supporters of the NAACP’s Detroit branch are boycotting its annual fundraiser on May 1. Why? Because Kid Rock is set to receive the branch’s Great Expectations award for his work in with young folks in and around Detroit.

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Senate DREAM Act Vote Set for Saturday

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid announced Thursday night that he would file cloture on the DREAM Act and a stand alone “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repeal, setting up a vote for as early as Saturday morning. The bill passed in the House earlier this month.

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Sneaky Anti-Abortion Crusade Has Doubly Harsh Impact on Minorities and the Poor

A handy legislative round-up from the Center for Reproductive Rights sums up the many ways state lawmakers have worked to limit women’s reproductive freedom in the past legislative session. And what a year it’s been.

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Republicans Reveal Just How Heartless They Feel Toward the Unemployed

The Senate has finally closed its four-month long ideological bludgeoning match over unemployment insurance, voting 60-40 yesterday to move forward with a bill extending the benefit through November for people who've been jobless for more than six months. After a final Senate vote, the bill will head to the House, where it will pass easily. So the demoralizing back and forth will come to an end--at least for the next four and half months.

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