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Our Government's Secrecy Has Caused Far More Deaths Than 9/11

Bradley Manning has done more for U.S. security than SEAL Team 6.

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Despite endless panic and hysteria on the subject from both major parties, the White House, and Congress, leaks have been good for us.  They’re how we came to learn much about the Vietnam War, much about the Watergate scandal, and most recently,  far more about state surveillance of our phone calls and email.  Bradley Manning’s leaks in particular have already yielded real, tangible benefits, most vividly their  small but significant role in sparking the rebellion that ejected a dictator in Tunisia and the way they  indirectly expeditedour military exit from Iraq.  Manning’s leaked reports of U.S. atrocities in Iraq, displayed in newspapers globally, made it politically impossible for the Iraqi authorities to perpetuate domestic legal immunity for America troops, Washington’s bedrock condition for a much-desired continuing presence there.  If it weren’t for Manning’s leaks, the U.S. might still be in Iraq, killing and being killed for no legitimate reason, and that is the very opposite of national security.

Knowledge is Not Evil

Thanks to Bradley Manning, our disaster-prone elites have gotten a dose of the adult supervision they so clearly require.  Instead of charging him with aiding the enemy, the Obama administration ought to send him a get-out-of-jail-free card and a basket of fruit.  If we’re going to stop the self-inflicted wars that continue to hemorrhage blood and money, we need to get a clue, fast.  Should we ever bother to learn from the uncensored truth of our foreign policy failures, which have destroyed so many more lives than the late bin Laden could ever have hoped, we at least stand a chance of not repeating them.

I am not trying to soft-peddle or sanitize Manning’s magnificent act of civil disobedience.  The young private humiliated the U.S. Army by displaying for all to see their complete lack of real information security. Manning has revealed the diplomatic corps to be hard at work  shilling for garment manufacturers in Haiti, for  Big Pharma in Europe, and under signed orders from then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to  collect biometric data and credit card numbers from their foreign counterparts.  Most important, Manning brought us face to face with two disastrous wars, forcing Americans to  share a burden of knowledge previously shouldered only by our soldiers, whom we love to call heroes from a very safe distance.

Did Manning violate provisions of the Uniform Code of Military Justice?  He certainly did, and a crushing sentence of possibly decades in military prison is surely on its way. Military law is marvelously elastic when it comes to  rape and sexual assault and perfectly easygoing about the  slaughter of foreign civilians, but it puts on a stern face for the unspeakable act of declassifying documents. But the young private’s act of civil defiance was in fact a first step in reversing the pathologies that have made our foreign policy a string of self-inflicted homicidal disasters. By letting us in on more than a half million “secrets,” Bradley Manning has done far more for American national security than SEAL Team 6 ever did.

Chase Madar is an attorney and the author of  The Passion of Bradley Manning: The Story Behind the WikiLeaks Whistleblower. A  TomDispatch regular, he writes for the London Review of Books, Le Monde Diplomatique, the American Conservative, and CounterPunch.  He is covering the Manning trial daily for the  Nation magazine.

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Copyright 2013 Chase Madar

 
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