OnEarth Magazine

On Her First Day in Office, U.K.'s New PM Theresa May Sacked Her Nation's Climate Agency - So Now What?

When the United Kingdom surprised the world last month by voting to leave the European Union, a brief period of panic ensued as global markets struggled to absorb the news: The world’s sixth-largest economy had just voluntarily withdrawn from a powerful consortium whose 28 partners collectively represent nearly a quarter of global GDP.

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WATCH: The Super Bowl Ad That Doritos Doesn't Want You to See

When Doritos announced its annual “Crash the Super Bowl” competition, which airs the winning fan-made commercial during the year's most coveted TV advertising opportunity, corporate watchdog SumOfUs answered with “The Ad Doritos Don’t Want You to See.”

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How Close Do You Live to a Toxic Waste Site? This New Map Will Tell You

More than 1,300 Superfund sites are littered across the United States. These are the places that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has deemed so contaminated with hazardous waste that they need long-term response plans to deal with the clean up. You might imagine these sites to be bubbling with bright green and orange goo, but most are much more inconspicuous, and their whereabouts aren’t always obvious to the public.

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EPA's Colorado Mine Spill: What You Need to Know

Right now Colorado’s Animas River looks more like an ad for Tang than the scenic blue ribbon it usually is. Last Wednesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released three million gallons of heavy-metal-laden mining waste, and the toxic surge is making its way downriver. Here’s the latest on what’s going on.

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Five Years on, We’ve Learned Nothing from the Largest Onshore Oil Spill in U.S. History

Five years ago, in the middle of the night, an oil pipeline operated by Enbridge ruptured outside of Marshall, Michigan. It took more than 17 hours before the Canadian company finally cut off the flow, but by then, more than a million gallons of tar sands crude had oozed into Talmadge Creek. The oil quickly flowed into the Kalamazoo River, forcing dozens of families to evacuate their homes. Oil spills of that magnitude are always disastrous, but the Kalamazoo event was historically damaging.

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Climate Change Poses Catastrophic Risks to Public Health, Says Major New Study

The medical journal The Lancet released a comprehensive review of the potential health effects of climate change today. In the paper, a blue-ribbon panel of experts from the fields of climate science, engineering, economics, medicine, and many others lay out powerful evidence of the public-health impacts climate change has already inflicted on us, as well as the dire consequences that await us in the near future. I have read many papers on climate change and health, and this one is both the most convincing and the most frightening. Here are three important take-home points.

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Here's Your Daily Weather Report Through 2100

Forget your weather app with its five- or even ten-day forecasts — a supercomputer at NASA has just provided us with high-resolution climate projections through the end of the century. The massive new 11-terabyte data set combines historical daily temperatures and precipitation measurements with climate simulations under two greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. The project spans from 1950 to 2100, but users can easily zero in on daily timescales for their own locales — which is precisely the point.

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Snowpack Crisis: How Warming Temperatures Threaten Washington's Farmers

Here in the Pacific Northwest, they’re calling it a “wet drought.” Unlike parched California, plenty of precipitation fell on Washington State this winter, including along the headwaters of the Dungeness River on the northern edge of the Olympic Peninsula. It’s a river whose waters Nash Huber has been counting on since settling here nearly five decades ago. “In the best of years, water is a bit of a prayer and a dance,” the 74-year-old organic farmer says. “This year it’s a whole lot of praying.”

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Climate Deniers Are Deliberately Trying to Misinform Children About Climate Change

Every now and then you come across a statement by a public official that is so ridiculous, so perfect in its unabashed wrongness, you have to read it a few times to fully appreciate it as a work of demagogic art.

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Why We Shouldn't Be Surprised by the Santa Barbara Oil Spill

When images of tar-stained beaches emerged out of Santa Barbara County on May 19, environmentalists and longtime residents experienced a painful moment of déjà vu. In 1969, a blowout on an offshore oil rig in the Santa Barbara Channel fouled the very same stretch of coast.

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