Nancy Altman

It's Medicare and Medicaid’s 55th birthday: Let’s expand benefits — not cut them

On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare and Medicaid into law. This crowning achievement was both the culmination of a decades-long effort to attain guaranteed universal health insurance and the first step in the quest for Medicare for All.

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Warning: Republicans are plotting to raid Social Security

Donald Trump is obsessed with defunding Social Security. In the midst of a catastrophic pandemic, millions of Americans are facing eviction and hunger if Congress doesn’t act now to extend unemployment benefits. Essential workers are in desperate need of testing and protective equipment.

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Trump is using the coronavirus to launch a Trojan horse attack on Social Security

Donald Trump’s proposal to cut the payroll contribution rate is a stealth attack on Social Security. Even if the proposal were to replace Social Security’s dedicated revenue with deficit-funded general revenue, the proposal would undermine this vital program.

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Trump’s awful Labor Day trifecta: Attacking workers, Social Security, and government itself

Labor Day is a holiday designed to honor America’s workers. Instead, Donald Trump continues to attack them. Indeed, his administration is in the midst of a stealth effort that not only attacks workers but also our earned Social Security benefits and our federal government. The long-term goals of Trump and his Congressional allies are to destroy the labor movement, wreck the federal government, and end Social Security.

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Lower Drug Prices Now: The power of the pharmaceutical industry is entrenched in our political system. Here's how you can fight back

Across 34 states today, the American people had one unified message for their elected representatives in Washington, D.C.: lower drug prices now.

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It’s Medicare’s birthday — here's how to improve it and give it to everyone

Fifty-four years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed Medicare into law. Over half a century later, Medicare has proven its tremendous worth. Before Medicare, nearly half of all seniors were uninsured. Now, virtually all Americans who have reached their 65th birthday are covered. Medicare is extremely popular, considerably more so than private for-profit health insurance. It is also far more efficient: Medicare has administrative costs of just 1.4 percent, while the administrative costs of private for-profit health insurance average more than 12 percent.

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This Labor Day, Gear Up to Stop Trump and GOP War on Workers

Labor Day is traditionally a time to honor workers and their invaluable contributions. But this year, it’s also a time to recognize the fact that American workers are under attack from the Trump administration, Republicans in Congress, and the billionaire donor class that owns these politicians. This Labor Day is an opportunity to join together and make plans to fight back.

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Here's Why the Social Security Debate is Replete with Revisionist History

President Franklin Roosevelt signed our Social Security system into law eighty-three years ago today, on August 14, 1935. It has stood the test of time.

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It's Medicare's 53rd Birthday - Here's Why Everyone Should Have It

On July 30th, 1965, Medicare became the law of the land. For over a half century, it has stood as a shining example of government at its best. Today, it efficiently provides high-quality health care to nearly 50 million seniors and nearly 9 million Americans with disabilities.

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Why Medicare for All Is Political Dynamite for the Democratic Party

In 1965, when Medicare for seniors was enacted, its champions saw it as a first step toward Medicare for All. When Medicare was expanded in 1972 to cover people with disabilities, a second big step toward that goal was taken. Many thought Medicare for children—Medikids or Kiddicare, as it was sometimes called—was just around the corner.

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Why Universal Health Care from Birth Is a Bedrock Right for Any Civilized Society

It is well past time that we make Medicare for All a reality. It should have been enacted decades ago.

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Expanding Medicare to Everyone Is the Only Way We Can Fully Protect It

Medicare is under attack. The only way to fully protect it is to expand it to everyone.

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Fox Is Scaring Americans With Lies About Social Security

In recent weeks, local news channels around the country aired at least 93 news reports sowing fear and lies about Social Security. These channels, most of which are affiliated with Fox Broadcasting Co., falsely claimed that a Social Security crisis is imminent. Absurdly, the segments said that the only way to prevent supposed benefit cuts in the near future is to cut benefits immediately.

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Here's How Social Security Would Be Strengthened by Medicare for All

In 2010, Professor Eric Kingson and I co-founded Social Security Works, a non-profit organization focused on protecting and expanding Social Security. Currently, Social Security Works is helping to lead the campaign for expanded and improved Medicare for All. But, wait: Isn’t that mission creep? Absolutely not!

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What Is Medicare for All?

Americans overwhelmingly agree: Medicare works. After decades of living with for-profit health insurance or, worse, no health insurance at all, your 65th birthday is eye-opening. That birthday brings Medicare. Once you enroll in Medicare, you generally have no claims to fill out and no insurance companies to contact. Doctors’ offices routinely do the paperwork. It is all so simple.

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The Social Security Customer Service Budget Finally Got an Increase - But It’s Only a Starting Point

Social Security doesn’t add a penny to the deficit. Neither does the cost of administering the program—the field offices, telephone lines, employee salaries, and other expenses. All of it comes from Social Security’s dedicated revenue and accumulated surplus, which is $2.9 trillion and growing. Congress does have the authority, though, to limit how much the Social Security Administration (SSA) can spend in any given year.

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Republican Leaders Aren't Even Trying to Hide Their Immorality Lately

Republican leaders claim that they are the party of family values. They are not. They also claim that they understand and respect hardworking Americans. They do not.

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The GOP's Tax Cut Bonanza Is a Major Attack on Medicare

Do you trust Paul Ryan to protect your Medicare benefits? How about White House budget director Mick Mulvaney, a former member of the House Freedom Caucus, and like Ryan, a longstanding foe of Medicare?

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Trump’s War on Dreamers and Other Immigrants Is a Frontal Attack on Everyone's Economic Safety Net

Donald Trump reportedly will announce on Tuesday that he will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the legal protection accorded to 800,000 young people, known as “Dreamers,” who have lived in the United States since they were children. Dreamers are contributing members of society who grew up here but happened to be born in another country to mothers who moved here without the proper papers.

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Gutting Obamacare: Opening Salvo in the Republican War on Seniors, Middle-Aged and Poor Americans

If Republican elites in Congress were honest about their agenda, no senior would ever vote Republican.

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Did Donald Trump Cheat on Social Security and Medicare Taxes, Paying Less Than Minimum Wage Workers?

In 1995, did billionaire Donald Trump pay less for Social Security and Medicare than minimum wage workers paid? Has he paid less in every subsequent year? If he did, he probably cheated.

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Important Assumptions About Trump: What He Says Will Likely Be False; What He Does May Very Well Not Be in the Interest of the Country

Now that a majority of electors have cast their ballots in favor of Donald Trump, he will have the lawful powers of the presidency, as prescribed in the Constitution and the laws of the United States. Legal authority is not equivalent, however, to political legitimacy, moral authority, or entitlement to civic respect.

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Taking A Stand On Social Security: Clinton’s Bold Proposal vs. Trump’s Hidden Agenda

AARP has asked all candidates to take a stand on the vital issue of Social Security. In fact, Hillary Clinton and the 2016 Democratic Party Platform have taken a powerful pro-Social Security stand. For that matter, Donald Trump and the Republican Party have taken a Social Security stand, too, though a disturbing one, which they seem to want to keep hidden from view. Their stand, once understood, should concern every Social Security beneficiary now and in the future.

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The Latest Absurdly Wrong Attack on Bernie Sander's Plan to Expand Social Security

Third Way, a center-right Washington think tank that prides itself on "fresh ideas," is reaching the point of desperation in its quest to cut Social Security and protect its Wall Street, K Street lobbyist, and GOP donors from paying their fair share.

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Elizabeth Warren's Solution for No 2016 Social Security COLA Increase: A Payment Equal To CEO Wage Growth

Ask any person with disabilities or any retiree you know whether the cost of his or her medical care, prescription drugs, food, and housing have increased in the last year.

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Hard Times For Seniors: No Cost of Living Increase for Social Security for 2016

On October 15, the Social Security Administration will announce some news that will be distressing to more than one in four households: there will be no Social Security cost of living adjustment ("COLA") for 2016.

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Most 2016 GOP Presidential Candidates Would Push Seniors Into Poverty By Cutting Social Security

In the first nationally televised 2016 presidential debate, Americans got a glimpse at what their economic future might hold if one of the Republican candidates becomes president -- and the picture wasn't pretty.

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Why Medicare-For-All Makes More Sense Now Than Ever

Medicare -- signed into law fifty years ago, on July 30, 1965 -- was supposed to be just the first step.

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Social Security Has Enough Money to Expand Benefits Now, Trustee's Report Shows

The Social Security Board of Trustees has just released its annual report to Congress. The most important takeaways are that Social Security has a large and growing surplus, and its future cost is fully affordable.

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