Kristen Gwynne

Guess What Potentially Devastating Drug Americans Are More Concerned About Than Heroin

Heroin may be the drug attracting front-page New York Times storiesprimetime television investigations, and attention from US presidential candidates, but alcohol is the drug that worries Americans most, a recent AP-NORC survey found.

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Five Super Tuesday States With Serious Drug Problems

This week is Super Tuesday, the biggest event of the 2016 presidential primary elections, with 13 states and one territory voting on which candidates to send to the Democratic and Republican National Conventions. Large-scale losers will stand little chance of progressing, given the breadth of demographics and cultures that these states represent. This year, the burning issues of opioid overdose and marijuana legalization have forced presidential candidates to repeatedly comment, however foolishly, on drug policy—something they typically prefer to avoid.

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There Goes That Stereotype: Native Americans Drink Less Than Whites, Says New Study

The stereotype of the Native American alcoholic dates all the way back to colonialism, but a new study may help to debunk that myth. Most Native Americans actually abstain from alcohol, and those who do drink are on average lighter drinkers than whites, finds the study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Drug Dependence.

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4 Things You Need to Know About Molly

Thanks to a string of name-checks by pop stars like Miley Cyrus, Madonna and Kanye West, as well as several tragic deaths at music festivals, ”molly”—aka MDMA—has rarely been far from the headlines in recent years.

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You Wouldn't Believe the Reason This Man Is About to be Executed

Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip may be running out of time before Wednesday, when he is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection, but the attorneys fighting tooth-and-nail to convince Governor Mary Fallin to grant him a 60-day stay of execution announced this week that they have uncovered new information adding doubt to his already widely contested conviction.

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The Love of My Life Died from Suicide and I'm Trying to Share His Music

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I could map out my teenage years and entire adult life by the moments spent with Keith. I first met him in middle school, when he was a shy, curly-haired skateboarder in a Nirvana T-shirt. When we were in eighth grade I learned he had a crush on me. We first kissed when we were in high school. We officially became boyfriend and girlfriend in my college dorm room. He was the artist, a musician, but he was always my muse.
We’d been off and on in the seven years since my sophomore year of college, partly because I could never find anybody whose love for me felt nearly as deep. We had been living together for six months, when in March of this year we had a terrible, late-evening argument. That night, Keith died “from suicide.”
The night suicide took Keith, we had gotten into an awful fight I’ll regret for the rest of my life, because he was the love of my life. I was still angry when I asked him to turn off the light in the hallway, and when he walked out of the room and did not come back right away, I assumed he stepped outside for a cigarette or a walk, maybe even into the living room to write in his journal. But after peeking through my bedroom window to the stoop out front 15 minutes after he had walked away, I realized his shoes were still in the house. He hadn’t gone for a walk, so I went looking for him inside.
That’s when I found him, in the early hours of March 7th, hanging by the neck from the landing above the stairs in our apartment. He stayed alive, his eyes bloodshot and half-open, for about 12 hours after I had cut him down. I knew, though, as soon as the paramedics told me his pupils were not reacting to light, that he wouldn’t survive. I had learned the brain’s failure to modulate pupils is a death sentence from reading Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking, which I read after another tragedy in 2013.
Had I gone looking for Keith sooner I could have rescued him. I know this because the paramedics, nurses and doctors all asked how long he’d gone without oxygen. I wonder if, during his last moments alive, Keith changed his mind. Did he take his final breath hoping that I would come and find him? Keith struggled with addiction and depression for years and I did everything I could to save him. And yet, I feel like I failed him at the moment he needed me most.

Read the rest of "Sharing My Boyfriend’s Songs After His Suicide" at Modern LossReprinted with the permission of Modern Loss and the author. Find out how to help someone affected by suicide.  

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You Can Have Your Kids Taken Away for Smoking Legal Pot

The following story first appeared on RH Reality Check. 

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Police Assault Teen So Violently During Search That His Testicles Burst

On January 7 in Philadelphia, 16-year-old Darrin Manning was on his way to play in a basketball game when police approached him and his teammates. Startled, the teens scattered. A police van picked them up soon enough. 

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