City Limits

Parents Battle City Schools for Special Ed Services

For Lorraine Doucette, the final straw in dealing with the New York City Department of Education came in March of 2013, when her five-year-old son Jason was hospitalized with dehydration.

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Not Even Toxic Waste Stops Gentrification: 3 New York Superfund Sites in Developing Neighborhoods

In the past five years, the federal Environmental Protection Agency has designated three sites in New York City to be part of the Superfund program, which goes after past polluters for financial penalties that it then employs to offset the massive cost of cleaning up decades-old industrial toxins.

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Striking Teacher Churn in Charter Schools

High-quality teachers are integral to academic achievement, experts agree, from Finland and Singapore to East New York and Morrisania. Cultivating excellent teachers and retaining them in the profession are paramount goals, shared by a bevy of bedfellows usually at odds in the education-reform debate, from teachers unions to charter-school champions like the Gates, Walton and Broad foundations.

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LGBTQ in Foster Care? A Struggle Amid Progress

Sitting outside in the freezing cold, Delilah Ramos, a bubbly teenager, jokes around with friends and giggles often.

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Getting Ready for College Is About More Than What Happens in the Classroom

Four young women, heads bobbing up and down, are leaning over their desks in Jeff Newman’s 11th grade social studies class at Fashion Industries High School in Manhattan in late March. But instead of peering at historical documents, trying to figure out what were the precipitating causes of the Civil War, they are perusing statistics on three colleges and comparing them according to a list of criteria ranging from total enrollment to percentage of applicants admitted, diversity, tuition, top majors and percentage of students who graduate in six years.

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How Scientologists Are Sneaking Their Way into Schools to Spread Their Propaganda

By its own estimate, Foundation for a Drug Free World, an education non-profit, has visited at least 20 percent of New York City's schools, public and private. That's over 14,000 children, it says, mainly in disadvantaged schools in outer boroughs. Drug Free World has won accolades from the City Council and the state Senate and been featured by over a dozen local publications, including the Daily News.

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The Truth About Child Abuse and Poverty

Cornell University released a large study [in March] positing that poverty causes higher instances of child abuse and neglect. Considering the advance publicity, it seemed to me that the average reader might overlook the crucial role that socioeconomic and racial biases play in determining which families come under the scrutiny of the child welfare system to begin with.

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Man Who Served More Than 20 Years in Prison After Coerced Confession Seeks Justice

A state judge last week set the next milestone in a 24-year debate over who is responsible for a notorious killing.

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Is the End of the School Library Upon Us? Budget Cuts Hit Librarians Where it Hurts

Paul McIntosh of Wadleigh Secondary School in Harlem has spent the past 10 years building what he calls "an environment where young people can explore all dimensions of the human experience." He recruits big-name guests for his popular speaker series, publishes an annual poetry anthology, even acts as an unofficial guidance counselor to any student who reaches out to him for help.

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Class in the Classroom: Why Middle-Income Students Are Being Left in the Dust

The following content originally appeared on City Limits

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