Chalkbeat New York

What My Bronx Students Think About Passing Through Scanners at School

I am a high school social studies teacher, and for two weeks every year, I report to a school with scanners to score Regents exams. I wait in line with students and follow their routine. I empty my pockets into a plastic tray and putting my bag on the conveyor belt. I am watched as I gather my things once they’ve passed inspection.

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New York City Promised Free Preschool to Every Family. So Why Do Some Students With Disabilities Struggle to Find Seats?

Shavon Gilliam realized her son Mikel was different about six months after his first birthday.

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What Do Kindergarteners Get Suspended for, Anyway?

When [New York] Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the city would no longer suspend students in kindergarten through second grade, he reinvigorated a debate about his “restorative” approach to school discipline.

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New Study: Teachers' Wages Lag Further behind Their Peers Than Ever Before

The wage gap between teachers and other professionals with similar education and experience reached an all-time high of 17 percent in 2015, according to a new study by the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank. In the mid-1990s, the gap was only 1.8 percent.

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New York City Will No Longer Suspend Students in Grades K-2

NEW YORK –– Schools will no longer be allowed to suspend students in kindergarten through second grade, one of a series of new safety policies announced Thursday that includes creating a process for removing metal detectors from some school buildings.

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It's Not About Quotas: The Real Story Behind How Two Brooklyn Schools Have Begun to Diversify

The Children’s School sits only a few blocks from the Gowanus Houses public housing community in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn, but in recent years served virtually none of the students who lived there. Meanwhile, in nearby Fort Greene, the Academy of Arts & Letters could only watch as the racial and economic diversity of its kindergarten class began to vanish seemingly overnight.

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In Four Poorer Neighborhoods, NYC Scraps Tests to Create New Gifted System

Faced with another year in which few children in several poor districts met the city’s official criteria for giftedness, New York City is changing the rules.

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Missing and Unlabeled Pages on NY State English Exams Spark Confusion Among Students

Errors in test booklets gave New York students a confusing start to the second day of state English exams on Wednesday.

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New Head of Education Policy in NY Declares: As a Parent, 'I Would Opt-Out, Too'

The newly elected head of New York state’s education policymaking body said if she were a parent, she would likely opt her child out of the state tests — and would not say if she hopes the boycotts shrink in number this year.

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Number of Black and Hispanic Students Winning Seats at NYC's Elite High Schools Drops Once Again

Despite sustained pressure on the city to increase diversity to the city’s most elite public high schools, the already-small number of black and Hispanic students winning seats fell this year, highlighting Mayor Bill de Blasio’s struggle to fulfill his promise to make those schools’ populations more reflective of the city.

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