Chalkbeat New York

What My Bronx Students Think About Passing Through Scanners at School

I am a high school social studies teacher, and for two weeks every year, I report to a school with scanners to score Regents exams. I wait in line with students and follow their routine. I empty my pockets into a plastic tray and putting my bag on the conveyor belt. I am watched as I gather my things once they’ve passed inspection.

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New York City Promised Free Preschool to Every Family. So Why Do Some Students With Disabilities Struggle to Find Seats?

Shavon Gilliam realized her son Mikel was different about six months after his first birthday.

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What Do Kindergarteners Get Suspended for, Anyway?

When [New York] Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the city would no longer suspend students in kindergarten through second grade, he reinvigorated a debate about his “restorative” approach to school discipline.

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New Study: Teachers' Wages Lag Further behind Their Peers Than Ever Before

The wage gap between teachers and other professionals with similar education and experience reached an all-time high of 17 percent in 2015, according to a new study by the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank. In the mid-1990s, the gap was only 1.8 percent.

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New York City Will No Longer Suspend Students in Grades K-2

NEW YORK –– Schools will no longer be allowed to suspend students in kindergarten through second grade, one of a series of new safety policies announced Thursday that includes creating a process for removing metal detectors from some school buildings.

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It's Not About Quotas: The Real Story Behind How Two Brooklyn Schools Have Begun to Diversify

The Children’s School sits only a few blocks from the Gowanus Houses public housing community in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn, but in recent years served virtually none of the students who lived there. Meanwhile, in nearby Fort Greene, the Academy of Arts & Letters could only watch as the racial and economic diversity of its kindergarten class began to vanish seemingly overnight.

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In Four Poorer Neighborhoods, NYC Scraps Tests to Create New Gifted System

Faced with another year in which few children in several poor districts met the city’s official criteria for giftedness, New York City is changing the rules.

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Missing and Unlabeled Pages on NY State English Exams Spark Confusion Among Students

Errors in test booklets gave New York students a confusing start to the second day of state English exams on Wednesday.

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New Head of Education Policy in NY Declares: As a Parent, 'I Would Opt-Out, Too'

The newly elected head of New York state’s education policymaking body said if she were a parent, she would likely opt her child out of the state tests — and would not say if she hopes the boycotts shrink in number this year.

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Number of Black and Hispanic Students Winning Seats at NYC's Elite High Schools Drops Once Again

Despite sustained pressure on the city to increase diversity to the city’s most elite public high schools, the already-small number of black and Hispanic students winning seats fell this year, highlighting Mayor Bill de Blasio’s struggle to fulfill his promise to make those schools’ populations more reflective of the city.

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New York City Moves to Shutter Three Charter Schools, Including One of Its Oldest

The city will move to close three charter schools at the end of this school year, including one that helped start New York’s charter movement, officials said Friday.

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4 Sobering Facts About Homeless Students

That was the theme of a [New York] City Council hearing Thursday where lawmakers questioned education department officials about how they are supporting the more than 86,000 district and charter school students who live in temporary housing — a 25 percent increase since 2010. Of those students, over 23,000 live in homeless shelters.

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In a First, New York's State Ed Commissioner Will Attend Charter Rally

In a first, State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia will attend a rally held by charter-school advocates [this] week, officials confirmed Friday.

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Why Does Everything We Do Right for Students with Disabilities Disappear on Testing Day?

Briana began the school year reading at “level E,” where a first grader should be in September. By November, she had progressed to “level G.” At the end of the year she reached “level J,” the benchmark for a second grader.

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The Solution to Diversifying STEM Starts Here

Jennora Blair wasn’t about to miss her first real college lecture.

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New York Mayor Approves Plan to Diversify Some City Schools

The city will allow seven schools to change their admissions policies to make sure they enroll a diverse mix of students, sources said Thursday, more than a year after a group of principals began lobbying to do so.

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For Two Sharply Divided Manhattan Schools, an Uncertain Path to Integration

The two schools sit nine blocks apart on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, but it’s as if they occupy different universes.

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Here Are Some of the Biggest Challenges Facing NYC Public Schools

The needle is slowly moving to address challenges facing New York City’s neediest students, but incremental progress means that the biggest problems remain daunting, a data-packed report on the city school system shows.

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Responding to Complaint, New York City Vows to Investigate Secular Learning at 39 Jewish Schools

With its pre-kindergarten expansion underway and its school-turnaround program under pressure to perform, New York City has its hands full with its own schools.

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Report: 40 Per Cent of NYC High Schools Do Not Offer Advanced Math and Science Courses

You need chemistry to become a registered nurse or an emergency medical technician. You need physics to become an architect.

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New York Drops Controversial Test-Maker Pearson

New York is ditching Pearson as its test-maker after years of high-profile missteps, switching to a smaller vendor that will cost more but comes with less baggage, the State Education Department announced Thursday.

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SUNY Charter Chair: We Won’t Authorize More Schools Without More Funding

If SUNY is going to oversee more charter schools, it’s going to need more money, the chair of its charter-school committee said Monday.

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What Charter School CEO Eva Moskowitz Gets Wrong About Restorative Discipline

Eva Moskowitz, the Success Academy Charter Schools CEO, recently denounced “restorative conflict resolution,” saying that the practice makes schools less safe. Students who are violent toward other students need “discipline … not dialogue,” she wrote in the Wall Street Journal, in a piece aimed at criticizing the de Blasio administration’s shift toward restorative justice in new school discipline rules. Without safety, students cannot learn, let alone experience the “joy” of a well-ordered, clean, safe school environment, argues Moskowitz, who boasts that her charter schools suspended 11 percent of students last year.

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Open Revolt: New York City's Test-Boycott Movement Is Small But Growing

As students wrapped up this [month’s] state English exams, advocates said more city parents than ever refused to let their children take the tests at schools with active “opt-out” movements, while other parents brought the boycott to schools that are new to the cause.

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Low Numbers of Black and Hispanic Students Admitted to NYC Specialized High Schools, Data Shows

Few black and Hispanic students won admission to eight of the city’s specialized high schools this year, leaving the schools’ diversity figures unlikely to change as their admissions process faces continued scrutiny.

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Study Shows NYC Charter School Suspensions Far Outpace Public School Ones

Updated — New York City charter schools suspended students at almost three times the rate of traditional public schools during the 2011-12 school year, according to a Chalkbeat analysis, though some charter schools have since begun to reduce the use of suspensions for minor infractions.

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SUNY Makes Rare Move to Close NYC Charter School

A Brooklyn charter school started by an ally of Mayor Bill de Blasio could become the first city charter school to be shut down in several years.

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NYC Set for Rapid Expansion of Bilingual Pre-K Programs

School was always a struggle for Giselle Ruiz.

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NYC Grants 12 of 24 Charter School Co-Location Requests

[New York City] plans to offer space in public school buildings to 10 Success Academy charter schools and two Icahn charter schools, but not to 12 other schools that requested it, officials said late Tuesday.

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Amid Recruitment Decline, Teach For America Leader Says N.Y. Training Site to Close

Teach for America is having trouble recruiting candidates to teach in New York City schools and will close its New York training site in anticipation of declining numbers, the organization’s New York City leader told program alumni on Friday.

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Why Is De Blasio Perpetuating Bloomberg’s Myth of the Failing School?

In his renewal plan for struggling schools, Mayor de Blasio has mistakenly fallen for a myth usually promoted by his conservative adversaries: that failure is the fault of individual schools, not the school system. His proposed solutions — community services, extra instructional time, and increased professional development, timed to a three year deadline prior to closure — treat these schools as isolated problems rather than the natural result of insidious central policies.

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