The Hechinger Report

Charter Schools Are Making School Segregation Worse - And Their Supporters Need to Own Up to That

Charter schools didn’t create segregation but the charter school movement isn’t helping to end it either.

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Many Hispanic Students Never Have a Teacher Who Looks Like Them

This story is part of a series looking at a shortage of black and Hispanic teachers and ideas for recruiting more to the profession. Other stories will look at how the decline of traditional preparation programs has cut off a pipeline of black teachers and two efforts to identify more potential teachers from low-income, minority neighborhoods.

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Fifty Years After Landmark School Segregation Report, Small Towns and Big Cities Wait for the Tide to Turn

African American students are just as likely to attend segregated schools today as they were in 1966, the year the seminal study known as the Coleman Report led to the desegregation of public schools.

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How Free Books Could Put an End to One College Cost Problem

College students in Rhode Island will save a collective $5 million a year if a plan to replace traditional textbooks with free materials is effective.

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Why "Wraparound" Services, Despite Their Advantages, Will Never Be the Solution to Bad Policy Decisions

We’re not going to “non-profit” our way out of poverty, housing affordability and economic injustice.

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Eligible but Got Nothing: Hundreds of Thousands of People with Disabilities Blocked from College Aid

QUEENS, N.Y. — Wendy Thompson always knew she wanted her son to go to college, but she didn’t realize so many people would disagree.

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The Five Things No One Will Tell You About Why Colleges Don't Hire More Faculty of Color

The reason we don’t have more faculty of color among college faculty is that we don’t want them. We simply don’t want them.”

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What Will It Take to Stop the Exodus of Minority Teachers?

Minority teachers are being driven out of schools by poor working conditions at rates higher than their non-minority colleagues, which only undermines years of recruitment efforts that have targeted minority teachers.

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What If Every Kid Got to Go to Summer Camp … During the School Year?

It was early evening in late May. Dinner was done and caper crews of students — “caper” is camp-speak for “chore” — had stacked the firewood into wheelbarrows, swept the dining hall floor, and (eew!) cleaned the bathrooms. The fading spring light slanted through the trees as the girls from Dogwood Cabin headed back to their bunks to practice their end-of-week skit.

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Who's Fighting for College for the Forgotten Majority?

Free college has become the banner headline for Democrats in an effort to attract the energetic, debt-ridden millennials who flocked to the Bernie Sanders campaign.

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It's Not Just the Republicans: How Democrats Have Weakened Education Policy in America

Are you better off now than you were eight years ago? For the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers (PFT), the answer to this perennial election question has to be a resounding ‘no.’

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The Republican Plot to Underfund Higher Education

Past is prologue.

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Schools in the Poorest State Become Even Poorer

JACKSON, Miss. — This fall, students at Enterprise Attendance Center in the small city of Brookhaven may get to draw, paint and make crafts in an elementary art class — the first the school has had in 12 years.

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College Admissions Favor the Rich. Let's Turn It Around Before Taxpayer-Funded Tuition Relief Becomes Another Handout for the Wealthy

As we prepare the U.S. for global competition, we find ourselves stuck with a myopic and outmoded approach in college admissions — one in which family income has gradually insinuated itself as the most important criterion.

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Here's Why Poorer Students Tend to Perform Worse in Math

Abstract, pure math — solving disembodied equations filled with x’s and y’s —  can often seem boring. Creative math teachers commonly try to come up with concrete, real-world examples to motivate students and make math relevant to adolescents.

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Does Education Software Actually Help Students Learn More?

Even proponents of educational technology admit that a lot of software sold to schools isn’t very good. But they often highlight the promise of so-called “adaptive learning” software, in which complex algorithms react to how a student answers questions, and tailor instruction to each student. The computer recommends different lessons to different students, based upon what they already know and what they still need to work on.

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The Orlando Shooting: Can Educating the Public Keep LGBTQ Youth Safe?

The urgency of protecting LGBTQ youth has now been revealed.

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What It's Like to Be a Transgender Student in Mississippi

Luke Knight’s mother is a florist, and she’s busy; Knight’s stepsister is getting married. Puffs of pink and white hog the top of the kitchen table in their comfortable home in Madison. Midday sunlight streams in from the windows and glistens on the plastic guarding a sleeveless white gown with a beaded bodice hanging from a door frame.

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New Study Finds Benefits of School Desegregation Last for Generations

It was 62 years ago this month that the United States Supreme Court issued its landmark decision that separate schools for whites and blacks were “inherently unequal,” thus setting in motion more than 800 school desegregation court orders around the country. A Berkeley economist, Rucker C. Johnson, has been tracking thousands of the children of that era into adulthood, as they had children of their own. And he’s concluded that integration has been a powerfully effective tool for raising the educational levels and living standards for at least two generations of black families.

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In College Remedial Classes, Unprepared Students Get the Least-Trained Teachers

At Rutgers University-Newark, 20 college students were working through a word problem on a rainy February morning when several got stuck.

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Data Show Segregation by Income (Not Race) is What’s Getting Worse in Schools

There’s a new narrative that U.S. schools are “resegregating” along racial lines. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights used the word “resegregation” on the headline of a recent press release and scheduled a briefing on the subject for May 20. And the word “resegregation” gets bandied about frequently at education conferences and in the press.

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Black and Brown Boys Don't Need to Learn "Grit," They Need Schools to Stop Being Racist

The National Interest: Once a month, this column is tackling broader questions about what the country should do about gaps in achievement and opportunity, especially for boys of color, in a partnership with The Root.

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Students on the Autism Spectrum Are Often as Smart as Their Peers: So Why Do So Few Go to College?

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Richard was one of the brightest kids in his high school class. His parents figured college was the next step, but that dream was nearly cut short in his first semester.

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Being Poor Should Not Mean That You Lose the Right to Go to College

Americans tend to treat high school graduates heading to college like baby birds leaving the nest  — we cross our fingers and hope we taught them how to fly.

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Why Students Should Never Be Afraid to Negotiate for a Better Price on College Tuition

When students who have been admitted to college ask advice from Lynn O’Shaughnessy, she’s quick to help them take a next step many didn’t know was even an option: haggling over the price.

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No Psychological Harm to Children Who Play Lots of Video Games, Study Says

This is the kind of research every kid trying to convince his parents to let him play video games dreams about: “Time spent playing video games may have positive effects on young children.” That was the headline on a March 2016 press release from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, promoting a new study co-authored by three members of its faculty.

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The Biggest Hole in the STEM Pipeline Starts Before Kindergarten

It’s a well-established problem that too few blacks and Hispanics, and too few women of all colors, pursue degrees and careers in the sciences. And much research has gone into why minority students aren’t taking as many science classes in high school, and later in college, as their white counterparts do. Wonks call it the “leaky STEM pipeline,” referring to all the students who leave science, technology, engineering and math as they progress through their educational careers.

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How Finland Broke Every Rule - and Created a Top School System

Spend five minutes in Jussi Hietava’s fourth-grade math class in remote, rural Finland, and you may learn all you need to know about education reform – if you want results, try doing the opposite of what American “education reformers” think we should do in classrooms.

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When Colleges Slash Tuition, Some Students Actually Pay More

As Americans agonize over spiraling tuition costs, Converse College seemed a beacon of hope when it slashed its advertised tuition by a whopping 43 percent.

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How Volunteer Moms Are Helping Community College Students Transfer to Four-Year Schools

On a rainy December afternoon, Eren Ozsar sat hunched over his laptop in a crowded Starbucks on the Upper East Side. He peered intently at the screen as he clicked through the admissions office site for Columbia University’s School of General Studies.

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