Food First

How a Former Black Panther Who's Been Serving Community Meals to Oakland's Poor Has Become a Victim of Gentrification

On Tuesday afternoons, North Oakland’s Driver’s Plaza is a lively place. Neighbors gather to listen to music, play chess, hang out and share a meal. The chef is “Aunti” Frances Moore, a former Black Panther and founder of the Love Mission Self Help Hunger Program, which has been serving a weekly meal for much of the past decade. Those gathering at Driver’s are typical of “the old Oakland,” largely but not exclusively African American, and struggling to get by in this rapidly gentrifying city. Many are visibly disabled. Most are elders, though there are also younger adults and children ranging from elementary to high school-age. Some rent rooms nearby while others are homeless, crashing with friends or living in vehicles.

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Our Food System Is Racist: Here's How to Fix It

The following excerpt is from A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism: Understanding the Political Economy of What We Eat, by Eric Holt-Giménez (Food First Books and Monthly Review Press, 2017).

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How Female Farmers Are Fighting Big Ag's Gender Injustice by Taking Control of Their Food Systems

While globalization and industrialization of the food system has resulted in fewer farms and farmers, the number of women farmers in the U.S. is increasing—and they’re fighting against a system that fails to serve them and their communities. Women are taking control of their food systems by farming, organizing in their communities, and advocating for systemic policy change that can create food systems that are better for farmers, workers, their communities, and our planet. Despite an increase in the number of women farmers, however, there is not a parallel trend in representation or power; women rarely control or hold power in the agriculture and food industry as a whole, and exploitation is rampant, especially among women of color.

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Trump May Have Killed the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but Food Justice Advocates Shouldn't Be Celebrating

Donald Trump has killed the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). The United States was to be the largest partner in a treaty that attempted to bring 40 percent of the world’s economy into one trading region. The decision is huge. The silence is deafening.

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Food Gentrification Is Hurting Poor Communities - One Group Is Fighting Back

Food gentrification is a concern shared by many food justice activists. Fueled by a wave of dietary trends, food justice proponents report food gentrification has driven up the cost of whole and natural foods that have been consumed by many communities for generations.

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How Tourism Can Support Local Food Sovereignty (Video)

How can tourism benefit food sovereignty? To what extent does a Food Sovereignty Tour (FST) differ from standard tourism? What are the main objectives and benefits of the FST?

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How Urban Gardening Can Teaching Students About Food Justice

As we film her interview, Ileana stands in front of a mural in the school hallway, framed by the word “Equity” on her left and the face of activist poet June Jordan on her right. Ileana is a program manager for Urban Sprouts, and as she will explain to us, these foundations—equity and activism—guide the work that Urban Sprouts does at this school and others in southeast San Francisco.

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How Organic Farming Hotspots Can Be an Opportunity for Rural Communities

“For us, cheese has always been a vehicle to achieve this other thing,” Mateo Kehler of Jasper Hill Farm said.

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An International Ethics Controversy Is Brewing Over a University GE Banana Study Funded by the Gates Foundation

A recent controversy about an upcoming genetically engineered (GE) banana study at Iowa State University (ISU) highlights public universities’ reluctance to engage with students in critical dialogue. Several graduate students, over the course of the last year, have raised critical questions about the claims made by ISU administrators and others that the GE banana study will save lives. The research will test the bioavailability of beta carotene in bananas genetically engineered to contain more of the Vitamin A precursor. The study recruited 12 female ISU students (ages 18-40) to eat GE bananas in return for $900. This study is one of the first human feeding trials of GE products and the first feeding trial of the GE banana.

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Women Farmers and Land Grabs in Haiti: An Interview With Iderle Brénus

In Haiti, the majority of the people working the land are women. Not only are they there during planting, weeding and harvesting, but they also play a role in transforming and marketing food products. They’re involved in the entire agricultural production process. This is why we call women the poto mitan, central pillar, of the country.

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