Center for Biological Diversity

Republicans Advance Three Bills Attacking Forests, Public Lands

The Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources will consider legislation Wednesday that would weaken environmental safeguards on, or outright give away, more than 630,000 acres of national forests, wildlife refuges and other public lands, clearing the way for private developers.

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I Gave My Boyfriend a Vegetarian Challenge: Here's How a Burger Lover Survived 30 Days Without Meat

“He finally did it!” I announced over the phone to my mom.

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The Escalating Use of Pesticides Is Harming Already Imperiled Aquatic Invertebrates

A new analysis published this month by U.S. Geological Survey scientists found pesticides at high enough concentrations to harm already imperiled aquatic invertebrates in more than half of 100 streams studied in the Midwest and Great Plains. The pesticide levels threaten species like the Hine's emerald dragonfly and the sheepnose mussel.

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Weak U.S. Air Quality Standards Contribute Directly to Thousands of Premature Deaths

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that weak U.S. standards for ground-level ozone and particulate matter contribute directly to thousands of premature deaths.

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House Committee Advances GOP Legislation Attacking National Forest Protections

A key House committee Tuesday approved legislation that would devastate national forests by gutting endangered species protections, limiting public comment and environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act and increasing unfettered logging across all national forests and public forests run by the Bureau of Land Management. 

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Common Pesticides Are Found in Majority of Human Umbilical Cords and May Harm Almost All Endangered Species

The Environmental Protection Agency last week released its first rigorous nationwide analysis of the effects of pesticides on endangered species, finding that 97 percent of the more than 1,800 animals and plants protected under the Endangered Species Act are likely to be harmed by malathion and chlorpyrifos, two commonly used pesticides. Another 78 percent are likely to be hurt by the pesticide diazinon. The results released today are the final biological evaluations the EPA completed as part of its examination of the impacts of these pesticides on endangered species.

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Non-Profit Funded by Koch and Exxon Attempts to Mislead Consumers About Solar Energy

Earlier this month, the Institute for Energy Research released a new report, The High Cost of Rooftop Solar Subsidies, which contained misleading claims about the economic costs of rooftop-solar subsidies and net-metering policies that support expansion of the distributed solar-energy market.

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Californians May Be Drinking Cancer-Causing Oil Industry Chemicals

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. -- People in California's Central Valley could be drinking water tainted by cancer-causing chemicals used in oilfields, and current water-testing procedures would not detect these substances, according to a scientific report recently released by researchers at PSE Healthy Energy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California and the University of the Pacific.

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Californians May Be Ingesting Cancer-Causing Oil Industry Chemicals

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. -- People in California's Central Valley could be drinking water tainted by cancer-causing chemicals used in oilfields, and current water-testing procedures would not detect these substances, according to a scientific report recently released by researchers at PSE Healthy Energy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California and the University of the Pacific.

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Obama Administration Urged to Halt Dumping of Offshore Fracking Waste Into Gulf of Mexico

An Obama administration proposal to continue allowing oil companies to dump unlimited amounts of offshore fracking chemicals into the Gulf of Mexico violates federal law and threatens endangered marine wildlife, the Center for Biological Diversity warned over the weekend.

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U.N. Says Mexico Risks Losing World Heritage Status If It Doesn't Protect Critically Endangered Vaquita Porpoise

At its recent 40th session, the United Nation’s World Heritage Committee directed Mexico to take immediate action to save the imperiled vaquita porpoise, or risk “in danger” status for its “Islands and Protected Areas of the Gulf of California” World Heritage site. The site was given World Heritage status in 2005, in part because it is home to the planet’s last remaining vaquita porpoises, as well as the totoaba, a large, endangered marine fish. Just weeks ago scientists estimated that fewer than 60 vaquita survive and the species is on the precipice of extinction.

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3.2 Million Wild Animals Killed by Highly Secretive USDA Program in 2015

The highly secretive arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture known as Wildlife Services killed more than 3.2 million animals during fiscal year 2015, according to new data released by the agency. The total number of wolves, coyotes, bears, mountain lions, beavers, foxes, eagles and other animals killed largely at the behest of the livestock industry and other agribusinesses represents a half-million-animal increase over the 2.7 million animals the agency killed in 2014.

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Deadly Pesticide Atrazine Is Harming Most Animal and Plant Species, Says EPA in New Report

The amount of the herbicide atrazine that’s released into the environment in the United States is likely harming most species of plants and animals, including mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles, according to a risk assessment released Thursday by the Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine is also well known as a hormone disruptor that has been linked to birth defects and cancer in humans, and contamination of ground-, surface- and drinking-water supplies. About 70 million pounds of atrazine are used in the United States each year.

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322 Million Americans Rang in New Year and Wildlife Are Feeling the Squeeze

This New Year’s Eve there are more than 322 million people in the United States — 2.5 million more than the number that rang in the New Year in 2015, according the U.S. Census Bureau. Among the states that crossed population milestones this year are North Carolina, the ninth state to reach 10 million people, and Florida, which became the third state with more than 20 million people.

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Frogpocalypse: Ribbits Fade as Frog Species Go Extinct at Alarming Rate

A new study finds that 200 frog species around the world have gone extinct since the 1970s and hundreds more could disappear in the next 100 years.

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Alaska Decides It's Fine to Kill Endangered Wolves

The state of Alaska has announced that it plans to allow a wolf hunt on Prince of Wales Island, despite recent evidence that the Alexander Archipelago wolf population on the island is in danger of extinction. In July, environmental groups asked the state to close the hunting and trapping season in response to a June report by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game showing alarmingly low levels of wolves the island. Instead of canceling the hunt, the state is allowing the harvest of nine wolves.

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Kentucky Prison Project Will Threaten Endangered Wildlife, Water and People

On July 31, the Center for Biological Diversity and Human Rights Defense Center sent letters urging the Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Fish and Wildlife to oppose a new maximum-security prison in Letcher County.

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Feds Urged to Ban Fracking in Eastern Colorado

Grassroots activists, artists and conservation groups submitted formal comments on August 3 calling on the Bureau of Land Management to prohibit new leasing of publicly owned fossil fuels and new hydraulic fracturing in its upcoming resource management plan for more than 6 million acres in eastern Colorado. Under the plan, the agency projects a potential 2,400 percent increase in the number of active federal oil and gas wells — from 543 to 13,041 — between 2011 and 2030 within the planning area.

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Is the Los Angeles Water Supply Being Poisoned?

On Thursday, the Center for Biological Diversity urged California officials to release results from an investigation into thousands of oil industry injection wells in the Los Angeles area that may be contaminating water and threatening public health.

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