Anna Sanford

The Rich Have Mostly Stopped Smoking Cigarettes - So They Are Mainly Killing Stressed-Out Poor and Working-Class People

Long gone are the days when cigarette smokers frequented restaurants and other public spaces; when people smoked freely undeterred by threats of cancer; when nearly everyone, regardless of income or geography, took part in the social ritual of lighting up. From 1965—when the Surgeon General first released its report on the negative effect smoking has on health—to 2017, the number of Americans who smoke declined from 41.9 percent to 15 percent. However, despite the relative progress over the fifty year fight against tobacco use, it is still affecting over 43.8 million people, many of whom are poor or live in rural areas.

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Babies Are Losing Sleep - And Touch Screens Are to Blame

The sight of tiny babies playing with touch screens is not exactly a new phenomenon. Toddlers strapped in strollers watch cartoons on their parents' smartphones. Young children with headphones larger than their heads bump into you on the sidewalk. And it’s no longer unusual to walk into a restaurant and notice that at many tables, every family member is chatting or texting away on their phones. But for all of the convenience and entertainment the digital age has given us, there are significant setbacks with lasting consequences. 

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What People Hate, Organized by State

Next time you are in Delaware, best not to mention Casey Affleck. And don’t even think of ordering tapas in North Dakota. Californians will surely judge you if you pull a fidget spinner while you wait for the bus.

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More and More People Are Getting Tattoos, and More Are Removing Them Too - What Gives?

Tattoos are more popular than ever in the United States with the industry growing 13 percent annually between 2011 to 2016 and acquiring an unprecedented $1 billion in revenue last year.

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The Odds Are Not in Favor of Working Mothers

Tara worked full-time and was already caring for a toddler when she had her second child. Like many American mothers, Tara was not granted maternity leave. Instead, she cobbled together vacation days to give herself a mere 20 days with her new baby following the birth. With money tight, “my family can’t afford the loss of even one paycheck,” she told the Atlantic last year.

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Like the Shoes You Order From Amazon, Opioids Are Made in China and Arrive Directly at Your Doorstep

Grant Seaver and Ryan Ainsworth, both 13, were best friends growing up in Park City, Utah. When their parents found the boys dead last fall, they had little idea of what might have killed them. Upon searching their social media accounts, they found conversations with another local teenager and talk of “pink”—the alias for U-47700, an extremely powerful opioid, eight times stronger than morphine and responsible for tens of the thousands of deaths that have occurred in the national crisis. Parents and relatives were shocked, wondering where their boys could have contracted a drug so potent and dangerous.

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As Recycling Declines and Centers Close, the Homeless Are Really Screwed

In 1848, Samuel Brannan ran through the streets of San Francisco, shouting “Gold! Gold from the American River!” To this day, California has maintained an almost-magical allure: the Golden State, a place where wealth seeps from the earth and lingers in the air, a promised land of economic prosperity. And so over the last two centuries, when times are tough, emigres have flocked to the fields of yellow poppies in search of gold hidden in the soil or jobs as fruit pickers and reprieve from the horrors of the Dust Bowl. But like the Rush of the 1840s and the rumors of economic mobility during Great Depression, California’s latest guarantee to those in need—earning money collecting recyclables—is falling short.

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Millennials Are Saving the Planet, One Kale Salad at a Time

It’s been three years since Beyonce made kale sexy, and vegetables are still growing in popularity. The Huffington Post declared that consumers under the age of 40 are eating 52 percent more vegetables than those of the same age a decade ago. Meanwhile, casual-dining restaurant chains, such as Applebee’s, are losing traction. Following sales slumps and closures, Sally Smith, the CEO of Buffalo Wild Wings, wrote a letter to shareholders saying that millennial consumers are to blame.

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The Tragedy of 'Mountain Dew Mouth' and the U.S.'s Insane Approach to Dental Care

Mountain Dew, the carbonated fluorescent-green soda that Willy the Hillbilly declared “will tickle your innards” in a 1966 commercial, has long been a staple of Appalachia. It was officially developed in Knoxville, Tennessee, in the mid-1900s, but it has ties to the wheat and rye distilled by Irish immigrants who settled in the region as coal miners during the previous century. Today, coal has left Appalachia, as have a host of other industries that brought economic opportunity. Mountain Dew, however, remains culturally significant. Sarah Baird, a writer who grew up in Eastern Kentucky, recently wrote about the importance of the drink to her sense of identity, saying, “It’s not just a beverage—it’s a portable sense of home.”

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Trump Evangelicals Face Growing Number of 'Hidden Atheists'

Religion was a major backdrop in the 2016 election. Donald Trump campaigned hard in white Christian America, promising voters that he would essentially turn back the clock to an America when religion and Christians overall were more influential in the country.

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