Rachel Cernansky

How 'Open Source' Seed Producers From the U.S. to India Are Changing Global Food Production

Frank Morton has been breeding lettuce since the 1980s. His company offers 114 varieties, among them Outredgeous, which last year became the first plant that NASA astronauts grew and ate in space. For nearly 20 years, Morton’s work was limited only by his imagination and by how many different kinds of lettuce he could get his hands on. But in the early 2000s, he started noticing more and more lettuces were patented, meaning he would not be able to use them for breeding.

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Superfoods Can Boost Your Health, but Can They Also Help the Environment?

It can seem like new health food fads pop up every week — fads that often fade as quickly as they appear. Two gaining steam lately, though, may be worth a longer look: baobab and moringa. Traditional fare in parts of Africa (and for moringa, Asia as well), these foods offer the potential not only to strengthen local economies, but to encourage conservation and carbon sequestration, too.

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Move Over Pesticides: Could Traditional Plants Hold the Secret to Saving Crops From Pests?

Without any effort at all, Hawa Saidi Ibura crushes dried beans, one at a time, between her fingers outside her home in Endagaw, a village in northern Tanzania.

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Pregnant? Here’s Why That Tuna Sandwich Might Be a Bad Choice

This piece originally appeared on Civil Eats on August 21, 2014.

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3 Countries in South America Defending Local Rights Against Destructive Water Projects

South America is home to some of the most biodiverse, and ethnically diverse, regions in the world, but some of the precious water resources are being used to boost energy for some while threatening local ecosystems and the health and survival of thousands, if not millions, of others.

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Australian Sushi Restaurant Fines Customers for Failing to Clean Their Plates

If you're eating at an Australian restaurant called Wafu outside of Sydney, you better finish your plate -- or pay a fine and not return. Chef Yukako Ichikawa is tired of the food waste people leave on their plates and the environmental impact, however unintentional, it all leaves behind.

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