Fran Korten

The Trump Era Will Test Us - What Are You Willing to Risk?

The signs of defiance and compassion are everywhere. Cities from San Francisco to New York are defending their status as “sanctuary cities,” ready to defy Donald Trump’s promised orders that could lead to the deportation of more than 2 million immigrants. People are wearing safety pins on their shirts to signal their willingness to support vulnerable people who may feel unsafe. Main Street Alliance businesses are putting signs on their store windows—“All are Welcome Here”—to show that their business is a safe spot no matter what the identity of the patron.

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How Independent Stores are Thriving -- Even in the Age of Amazon

So we all know that the likes of Wal-Mart, Target, and Amazon are killing Main Street businesses, right? It’s certainly partly true. Those retailing behemoths have devastated a lot of communities across the country, and they’re still growing.

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The Woman Who Just Might Save the Planet and Our Pocketbooks

For one thing, she is the first woman to receive the prize. Her Ph.D. is in political science, not economics (though she minored in economics, collaborates with many economists, and considers herself a political economist). But what makes this award particularly special is that her work is about cooperation, while standard economics focuses on competition.

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10 Ways to Stop Corporate Dominance of Politics

The recent Supreme Court decision to allow unlimited corporate spending in politics just may be the straw that breaks the plutocracy’s back.

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Twelve Ways You Can Safeguard the Vote

Are you worried that we will wake up November 5th to find that, once again, election results in key races are in question? Here's what you can do.

These recommendations from the staff at YES! Magazine are simple ways you can protect your own vote--and the fairness of the system, based on the recommendations of leading voting integrity advocates.

Please forward this checklist to others to help make our election system work.

BEFORE ELECTION DAY

1. Check your registration. Even if you think you're registered, you may not be. Check online at www.CanIVote.org.

2. Vote now. Check if early voting is possible in your state. If you're voting by mail, check carefully where you need to sign, how to seal the envelope, and how to mark the ballot. And note: Some ballots require extra postage.

3. Practice your vote. Electronic voting machines can be difficult to use. Verifiedvoting.org is preparing links to video demos of how to vote on the machine you will find at your polling station. If you'll be using a paper ballot, check out the sample included in your voter pamphlet.

4. Find out who's in charge. Make a phone list of your county and state election officials -- it may save valuable time on Election Day if you need to get registration verification or other information.

ON ELECTION DAY

5. Vote early. Avoid the frustration of long lines. Also, if you encounter problems, you'll have time to sort them out and may be able to help others.

6. Take your government-issued ID and your cell phone, if you have one. If you have problems, or see problems, call a hotline immediately (see point #9). You may not need ID to vote, but it's best to have it. If you have trouble with your registration, ask for a provisional ballot.

7. Avoid Straight Party Voting, if it's an option in your state. Vote for each race individually, even if it takes a little longer. 

8. Verify your vote. If you're voting on an electronic voting machine, check the review screen to make sure it reflects your vote. If the machine produces a paper record, check as you go along that everything is working correctly. If not, speak to a polling attendant -- don't leave until you're sure your vote has been properly recorded.

9. Document and report. If you encounter difficulties, or see others experiencing difficulties (excessive lines, voter harassment, malfunctioning machines, etc.), make a detailed record. Get all the facts you can--location, names, specific problem.

The best way to report problems is to call 1-866-OUR-VOTE (1-866-687-8683), which has volunteer lawyers in 15 locations standing by to provide rapid-response assistance. You can also contact your party of choice. We have more suggestions here.

AFTER ELECTION DAY

10. Call your candidate. If there are questions about an election result, urge your candidate to ask for an audit. Ask how you can help.

11. Call your election officials. If you have concerns, let your county and state election officials know, and monitor their response. Ask them not to certify the election before all challenges and recounts are finished. And send a copy of your message to your local newspaper editor. If you're confident about the election result, thank the officials for a difficult job well done.

INTO THE FUTURE

12. Work for fair, transparent elections. 66% of Americans don't trust the electronic voting machines many of us will be voting on this November. Join the movement for election reform in between elections. Use our YES! Tools to find out how.

BRAND NEW STORIES

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