Dr. David Suzuki

Will the 21st Century Bring Brighter Times or a New Dark Age?

If you own a smartphone, you have more computing power at your fingertips than NASA scientists had when they put people on the moon in 1969. And it's in a small device, unlike the massive hardware the space agency used.

Keep reading... Show less

15,000 Scientists Issue Urgent Warning: Humanity Is Failing to Safeguard the Planet

A year ago, we revisited the 1992 “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity." Signed by a majority of Nobel laureates in sciences at the time and more than 1,700 leading scientists worldwide, the document warned, “Human beings and the natural world are on a collision course.”

Keep reading... Show less

200 Years Ago, an Environmental and Fuel Crisis Inspired One of the Greatest Inventions

Two-hundred years ago last June, an environmental and fuel crisis inspired one of our greatest inventions—a device so simple, efficient and useful it’s turning out to be part of the solution to today’s environmental and fuel crises.

Keep reading... Show less

As the Trump Administration Continues to Threaten the Planet, This Is No Time to Be Complacent

Before he died on November 7, 2016, the great poet Leonard Cohen offered a prophetic warning in his final album’s title song: “You want it darker / We kill the flame.” As we near the northern hemisphere’s longest night of the year, it seems like a monumental challenge to keep the flickering flame from being extinguished.

Keep reading... Show less

Renewable Energy Isn't Perfect, But It's Far Better Than Fossil Fuels

In their efforts to discredit renewable energy and support continued fossil fuel burning, many anti-environmentalists have circulated a dual image purporting to compare a lithium mine with an oil sands operation. It illustrates the level of dishonesty to which some will stoop to keep us on our current polluting, climate-disrupting path (although in some cases it could be ignorance).

Keep reading... Show less

Oil and Plastic Are Choking Planet Earth: We Have to Stop Pretending This Isn't a Problem

People who deny that humans are wreaking havoc on the planet's life-support systems astound me. When confronted with the obvious damage we're doing to the biosphere, from climate change to water and air pollution to swirling plastic patches in the oceans, some dismiss the reality or employ logical fallacies to discredit the messengers.

Keep reading... Show less

One Major Lesson From the Disastrous Floods Around the World: We've Been Building Cities All Wrong

When the Aztecs founded Tenochtitlán in 1325, they built it on a large island on Lake Texcoco. Its eventual 200,000-plus inhabitants relied on canals, levees, dikes, floating gardens, aqueducts and bridges for defense, transportation, flood control, drinking water and food. After the Spaniards conquered the city in 1521, they drained the lake and built Mexico City over it.

Keep reading... Show less

We Would Need 1.7 Earths to Sustain Humanity's Current Rate of Resource Consumption

August 2 was Earth Overshoot Day. Unlike Earth Day, it’s not a time to celebrate. As the Earth Overshoot Day website explains, it marks the time when "we will have used more from nature than our planet can renew in the whole year." That's the definition of "unsustainable" and it means we're using up the biological capital that should be our children's legacy. We would require 1.7 Earths to meet our current annual demands sustainably.

Keep reading... Show less

Are Industrial Agriculture and Genetic Modification the Answer to Feeding Humanity?

The following excerpt is from Just Cool It! A Post-Paris Agreement Game Plan, by David Suzuki and Ian Hanington (Greystone Books, 2017)

Keep reading... Show less

In the Face of Climate Crisis, Trump Has Become an International Pariah: Sad!

In withdrawing from the Paris Agreement, U.S. President Donald Trump demonstrated monumental ignorance about climate change and the agreement itself. As Vox energy and climate writer David Roberts noted about Trump’s announcement, “It is a remarkable address, in its own way, in that virtually every passage contains something false or misleading.”

Keep reading... Show less

Earth's Oceans Face Many Overwhelming Challenges, but Marine Protection Is Slowly Paying Off

Do you remember Harry Potter's invisibility cloak? It turns out wizards aren't the only ones who can vanish from sight with a special coat. Marine researchers have discovered shrimp-like crustaceans called hyperiids that can hide in the open using internal nanotechnology to cloak themselves in invisibility. That's just one among many fascinating discoveries that gave recent cause to celebrate on World Oceans Day.

Keep reading... Show less

The Notion That We Must Dominate Nature Has Led to Widespread Devastation That Threatens Our Very Survival

The notion that we must conquer or dominate nature has governed human behaviour for a relatively short period of our 150,000-year history on this 4.5-billion-year-old planet. It’s an understandable impulse. Our intelligence and foresight allowed us to develop complex societies, and gave us a sense of control over our existence in the face of powerful, often threatening natural forces.

Keep reading... Show less

Why Long Work Hours Don’t Work for People or the Planet

In 1926, U.S. automaker Henry Ford reduced his employees’ workweek from six eight-hour days to five, with no pay cuts. It’s something workers and labour unions had been calling for, and it followed previous reductions in work schedules that had been as high as 84 to 100 hours over seven days a week.

Keep reading... Show less

March for Science on Earth Day to Resist Trump's War on Facts

Science isn’t everything. But it is crucial to governing, decision-making, protecting human health and the environment and resolving questions and challenges around our existence.

Keep reading... Show less

As Trump Empowers Big Oil and Pushes Climate Denial, Wind and Solar Surge

The battle lines are drawn — in some cases literally. On one side are those reaping massive profits from fossil fuels, determined to extract and sell as much as possible before the market dries up. On the other are those who see the amazing potential of energy conservation, renewable energy and other innovations to reduce pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, ecosystem destruction and exploitation of valuable non-renewable resources.

Keep reading... Show less

How a Culture of Overworking Leads to Environmental Destruction

Since the 1950s, almost everything about work in the developed world has changed dramatically. Rapid technological advances continue to render many jobs obsolete. Globalization has shifted employment to parts of the world with the lowest costs and standards. Most households have gone from one income-earner to at least two. Women have fully integrated into the workforce, albeit often with less-than-equal opportunities, conditions and pay. A lot of our work is unnecessary and often destructive — depleting resources, destroying ecosystems, polluting air, water and soil, and fuelling climate change.

Keep reading... Show less

The Only Way to Understand Climate Change in a Post-Truth World

Seeing terms like "post-truth" and "alternative facts" gain traction in the news convinces me that politicians, media workers and readers could benefit from a refresher course in how science helps us understand the world. Reporting on science is difficult at the best of times. Trying to communicate complex ideas and distill entire studies into eye-catching headlines and brief stories can open the door to misinformation and limited understanding.

Keep reading... Show less

How Anthropocentrism Puts All Species at Risk - Including Ours

For decades, scientists have warned that we’re on a dangerous path. It stems from our delusion that endless growth in population, consumption and the economy is possible and is the very purpose of society. But endless growth is not feasible in a finite biosphere. Growth is not an end but a means.

Keep reading... Show less

How Biomimicry Can Help Create a More Sustainable World

If you fly over a forest and look down, you’ll see every green tree and plant reaching to the heavens to absorb the ultimate energy source: sunlight. What a contrast when you look down on a city or town with its naked roofs, asphalt roads and concrete sidewalks, all ignoring the sun’s beneficence! Research shows we might benefit by thinking more like a forest.

Keep reading... Show less

5 Steps Society Must Take to Avoid the Worst Impacts of Climate Change

The longer we delay addressing environmental problems, the more difficult it will be to resolve them. Although we’ve known about climate change and its potential impacts for a long time, and we’re seeing those impacts worsen daily, our political representatives are still approving and promoting fossil fuel infrastructure as if we had all the time in the world to slow global warming.

Keep reading... Show less

Here's Why We Should Stop Giving Things as Gifts for the Holidays

How much stuff will you give and receive this holiday season? Add it to the growing pile: the 30-trillion-ton pile. That’s how much technology and goods humans have produced, according to a study by an international team led by England’s University of Leicester. It adds up to more than all living matter on the planet, estimated at around 4 trillion tons.

Keep reading... Show less

Why So-Called 'World Class' Oil Spill Response Is Anything But

In July, a pipeline leak near Maidstone, Saskatchewan, spilled about 250,000 liters of diluted oil sands bitumen into the North Saskatchewan River, killing fish and birds and compromising drinking water for nearby communities, including Prince Albert. It was one of 11 spills in the province over the previous year.

Keep reading... Show less

How Do We Overcome Polluted Public Discourse When Climate Deniers Are Now in Charge?

The U.S. election was a chilling illustration of the atrocious state of public discourse. It doesn’t bode well for a country once admired for leadership in education and science.

Keep reading... Show less

Extinction Crisis Signals It's Time to Change Course

Clean air, water and soil to grow food are necessities of life. So are diverse plant and animal populations. But as the human population continues to increase, animal numbers are falling. There’s a strong correlation. A comprehensive report from the World Wildlife Federation and the Zoological Society of London found that wild animal populations dropped by 58 percent between 1970 and 2012, and will likely reach a 67 percent drop by 2020 if nothing is done to prevent the decline.

Keep reading... Show less

Presidential Debates That Ignore Climate Threat Are a Punch in the Face to Humanity

Scientists worldwide accept that Earth is warming at an unusually rapid rate, that humans are primarily responsible, mainly by burning fossil fuels, and that the consequences for humanity will be disastrous if we don’t take immediate, widespread action. The U.S. Defense Department calls climate change a security risk “because it degrades living conditions, human security and the ability of governments to meet the basic needs of their populations.”

Keep reading... Show less

By 2050, Two-Thirds of Humans Will Be Crammed Into Cities: Urban Farms Can Help

Humans are fast becoming city dwellers. According to the United Nations, “The urban population of the world has grown rapidly from 746 million in 1950 to 3.9 billion in 2014.” Sixty-six percent of us will likely live in urban environments by 2050. The number of mega-cities (more than 10 million inhabitants) is also skyrocketing, from 10 in 1990 to 28 in 2014—home to more than 453 million people—and is expected to grow to 41 by 2030.

Keep reading... Show less

Climate Deniers' Claim That More Carbon Dioxide Is Good Because It's Plant Food Is a Bunch of Hot Air

Life evolved to live within limits. It’s a delicate balance. Humans need oxygen, but too much can kill us. Plants need nitrogen, but excess nitrogen harms them and pollutes rivers, lakes and oceans. Ecosystems are complex. Our health and survival depend on intricate interactions that ensure we get the right amounts of clean air, water, food from productive soils and energy from the sun.

Keep reading... Show less

Consumers Urged to Avoid Buying Salmon to Let Depleted Fisheries Recover

Salmon have been swimming in Pacific Northwest waters for at least seven million years, as indicated by fossils of large saber-tooth salmon found in the area. During that time, they’ve been a key species in intricate, interconnected coastal ecosystems, bringing nitrogen and other nutrients from the ocean and up streams and rivers to spawning grounds, feeding whales, bears and eagles and fertilizing the magnificent coastal rainforests along the way. For as long as people have lived in the area, salmon have been an important food source and have helped shape cultural identities.

Keep reading... Show less

Airline Emissions Are Flying Way Too High: Can New Technologies and Carbon Reductions Help?

In July, Solar Impulse 2 became the first airplane to fly around the world without using fuel. At the same time, the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been working on electric planes. These developments mean air travel and transport could become more environmentally friendly, with less pollution and fewer greenhouse gas emissions, and planes would be quieter.

Keep reading... Show less

Humans Are Super Predators, but Unlike Wild Predators, We Can't Manage Complex Ecosystems

Humans are the world’s top predator. The way we fulfil this role is often mired in controversy, from factory farming to trophy hunting to predator control. The latter is the process governments use to kill carnivores like wolves, coyotes and cougars to stop them from hunting threatened species like caribou—even though human activity is the root cause of caribou’s decline.

Keep reading... Show less

From Ecosystems to Species to Cultures, Diversity Is Key to Survival

It’s been shocking to watch news of the Brexit vote in Britain, Donald Trump’s promise to build a wall between Mexico and the U.S. and the ongoing threats and violence against ethnic minorities in many parts of the world. I’m not a political or social scientist, but my training as a biologist gives me some insight.

Keep reading... Show less
BRAND NEW STORIES