technology

Policing the digital frontiers: Is India weaponizing technology to silence civil society?

Gmail on Laptop in Dark. Image via Flickr by Image Catalog. Public Domain.On June 15, 2020, Amnesty International and Citizen Lab, an interdisciplinary laboratory based at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, uncovered a coordinated spyware campaign that targeted nine Indian human rights defenders between January to October 2019.In the world’s largest democracy, these types of incidents are a concern especially when viewed alongside the government’s broader crackdown on dissent. Under the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) led government, India has gained global notoriety ...

Artificial intelligence and the hyperwar: How the Pentagon is barreling toward AI-driven combat - posing a global existential risk

There could be no more consequential decision than launching atomic weapons and possibly triggering a nuclear holocaust. President John F. Kennedy faced just such a moment during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 and, after envisioning the catastrophic outcome of a U.S.-Soviet nuclear exchange, he came to the conclusion that the atomic powers should impose tough barriers on the precipitous use of such weaponry. Among the measures he and other global leaders adopted were guidelines requiring that senior officials, not just military personnel, have a role in any nuclear-launch decision.

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Technology giants like Amazon, Facebook and Google didn’t deserve public trust in the first place

Amazon may have been expecting lots of public attention when it announced where it would establish its new headquarters – but like many technology companies recently, it probably didn’t anticipate how negative the response would be. In Amazon’s chosen territories of New York and Virginia, local politicians balked at taxpayer-funded enticements promised to the company. Journalists across the political spectrum panned the deals – and social media filled up with the voices of New Yorkers and Virginians pledging resistance.

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Is the Rise of Social Media Proof That We're All Narcissists?

Narcissism is defined as excessive self-love or self-centredness. In Greek mythology, Narcissus fell in love when he saw his reflection in water: he gazed so long, he eventually died. Today, the quintessential image is not someone staring at his reflection but into his mobile phone. While we pine away for that perfect Snapchat filter or track our likes on Instagram, the mobile phone has become a vortex of social media that sucks us in and feeds our narcissistic tendencies. Or so it would seem.

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Democratic Socialists of America-Backed Candidate Julia Salazar Is Challenging Silicon Valley with Her Ambitious Tech Agenda

Half a year ago, Doug Schifter was at his wits’ end. The 61-year-old livery driver had seen a respectable livelihood gutted by deregulation and felt abandoned by his representatives. As ride-sharing apps like Uber and Lyft replaced a once-thriving industry with precarious and unprotected “gig” employment, he was pushed to work 100-120 hour weeks just to make end’s meet.

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Technology Is Making America a Nation of Big Babies - Ready to Embrace Authoritarian Rule

If you regularly watch TV, you’ve probably seen a cartoon bear pitching you toilet paper, a gecko with a British accent selling you auto insurance and a bunny in sunglasses promoting batteries.

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Here's Why Thousands of Swedes are Inserting Microchips into Themselves

Thousands of people in Sweden have inserted microchips, which can function as contactless credit cards, key cards and even rail cards, into their bodies. Once the chip is underneath your skin, there is no longer any need to worry about misplacing a card or carrying a heavy wallet. But for many people, the idea of carrying a microchip in their body feels more dystopian than practical.

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Those Six-Digit iPhone Passwords Are Becoming Obsolete for Protecting Your Privacy

Six-Digit iPhone Pass Codes Are No Longer That Safe

iPhones protected by a six-digit pass code may no longer be safe thanks to a cheap tool being marketed to police that can unlock a smartphone in just days. Grayshift has developed an iPhone decryption device called GrayKey that can break through some devices in just two hours. Presumably, the device is able to skip Apple’s…

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Will the 21st Century Bring Brighter Times or a New Dark Age?

If you own a smartphone, you have more computing power at your fingertips than NASA scientists had when they put people on the moon in 1969. And it's in a small device, unlike the massive hardware the space agency used.

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