education

College grads struggle to launch careers in a pandemic economy. 'I chose the worst year to get my life together'

CHICAGO — Kevin Zheng had big plans lined up as he prepared to graduate in the spring with a degree in criminal justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago.The 23-year-old thought he’d enter the job market well-prepared, with an internship at the Chicago Police Department on his resume.But the COVID-19 health crisis upended that plan. His internship was canceled, his graduation was delayed until August, and he sat in his bedroom for the virtual commencement ceremony. Now he’s looking for a job in a pandemic-induced recession.“I chose the worst year to get my life together,” said Zheng, ...

Was it realistic to expect college students to follow COVID-19 protocols? The science suggests no.

Back in June, leading adolescent brain researcher Laurence Steinberg wrote a New York Times op-ed predicting that students returning to college campuses during a pandemic would not go well.“These plans are so unrealistically optimistic that they border on delusional and could lead to outbreaks of COVID-19 among students, faculty and staff,” wrote Steinberg, who is a professor of psychology at Temple University and the author of “Age of Opportunity: Lessons From the New Science of Adolescence.”He was right, of course. A late September survey conducted by the New York Times looked at more than 1...

Suffering from COVID-19 science overload? This university team wades through the deluge so you don't have to

SEATTLE — Remember early spring, when it felt like we were all plunged into a crash course in epidemiology, heads spinning with terms like “R-naught,” “flatten the curve” and “herd immunity?” Every new nugget of data and scientific insight about the novel coronavirus was headline news, ricocheting from Twitter to technical journals to talking heads.The wall-to-wall coverage has eased since then, but the pace of discovery hasn’t. Every day, hundreds of new research papers are published or posted about the virus and pandemic, ranging from case studies of single patients to randomized, controlled...

An Illinois university got major pushback for cutting religion, French and anthropology. But other colleges are dropping the humanities too

CHICAGO — Scott Sheridan didn’t expect his 23 years of teaching at Illinois Wesleyan University to end like this.Though fewer students are pursuing degrees in his areas of study these days, many still participate. This semester, more than 50 students at the campus in Bloomington are taking advanced classes in French cinema and Italian cultural history. The spots filled up so quickly that more were added, Sheridan said.But programs in French and Italian won’t continue beyond this school year. And neither will those in religion, anthropology, American cultural studies and three other academic de...

Study: LGBTQ people nearly 4 times as likely to be victims of violent crime than non-LGBTQ individuals

Sexual and gender minorities in the U.S. are much more likely to be the victims of violent crimes than those outside those communities, according to a study released Friday by The Williams Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law.As a group, LGBTQ people are nearly four times as likely to suffer victimization than their heterosexual, cisgender counterparts, the study suggested.Although previous research has shown that sexual and gender minorities experience higher levels of criminal victimization, there hasn’t been a comprehensive national study to analyze the issue...

Betsy DeVos turns school gun violence commission into a tool that will hurt minorities - and ignore gun violence completely

In the weeks after the Parkland school mass shooting that left 17 people dead, the Trump administration was highly criticized for doing nothing to protect students. As the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student survivors quickly became student activists, and heroes to the left, the NRA and President Trump knew they were losing ground.

Keep reading... Show less

Historic union-backed strike yields new contract win for teachers and students in Chicago

Less than two weeks after the first-of-its strike by organized charter school teachers, members of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) voted nearly unanimously over the weekend to approve a new contract won by their walkout and celebrated the new terms as a result of collective action and community power.

Keep reading... Show less

Fight for federal right to education takes a new turn

A new fight to secure a federal constitutional right to education is spreading across the country. This fight has been a long time coming and is now suddenly at full steam.

Keep reading... Show less

How Can You Talk to Kids About Factory Farming? These Books Can Help.

Many children play with toys that evoke the bucolic life on a farm. And many will likely visit a small local farm, where animals have space and access to sunlight and the outdoors. But most kids are probably not aware that, for the vast majority of farmed animals, life is anything but happy.

Keep reading... Show less

Kids in the Classroom Can Help Single Moms Rise from Poverty

What are the options when child care suddenly falls through and your next class starts in 15 minutes?

Keep reading... Show less
alternet logo

Tough Times

Demand honest news. Help support AlterNet and our mission to keep you informed during this crisis.