beer

Sorry bearded hipsters — the original brewers were women

In Brew Beer Like a Yeti, Jereme Zimmerman gives brewing tips and takes readers on a ride through the history of beer making. In this excerpt, he finds evidence that down the ages, women played a central role in developing the craft behind your favorite microbrew.

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Pot and Hops: A Family Reunion

Once upon a time, cannabis and humulus (hops) were the same plant.

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Popular Beer and Wine Brands Contaminated With Monsanto's Weedkiller, Tests Reveal

The past few years have revealed some disturbing news for the alcohol industry. In 2015, CBS news broke the announcement of a lawsuit against 31 brands of wines for high levels of inorganic arsenic. In 2016, beer testing in Germany also revealed residues of glyphosate in every single sample tested, even independent beers. Moms Across America released test results of 12 California wines that were all found to be positive for glyphosate in 2016. We tested further and released new findings last week of glyphosate in all of the most popular brands of wines in the world, the majority of which are from the U.S., and in batch test results in American beer.

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Primitive, Sacred Brews Were Drunk Not for Their Flavor, but for Their Psychotropic Effects

This excerpt is from Pascal Baudar’s book The Wildcrafting Brewer: Creating Unique Drinks and Boozy Concoctions from Nature’s Ingredients (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2018) and is reprinted with permission from the publisher.

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Jim Hightower: Why You Should Have Beer For Breakfast

Let's talk about two daily essentials: Breakfast, and of course, beer.

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Liquid Genocide Destroyed the Pine Ridge Reservation -- Then They Fought Back

Dashing through wild sunflowers and tall grass, Joe Pulliam slid through the barbed-wire fence that marks the state border. With two large wooden tipi poles slung over his shoulder, sweating in the morning sun, he knew it was trespassing. But this was about something bigger.

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Is My Drinking Normal, or Could I Be an Alcoholic?

Is my drinking normal, or could I be an alcoholic?

Alcoholism rose 49 percent in the last decade. Nearly every group of people in the United States right now is drinking more than they did a decade ago. Deposit Photos The trouble with alcohol is that it’s everywhere. We don’t treat any other drug the way we treat alcohol, marijuana included, and in part that’s because…

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Huge Battle Over Building the Largest Pipeline in North America - and We Have World's First 'Anti-Pipeline' Beer

The TransCanada pipeline (called Energy East) is intended to transport oil from the tar sands in Alberta to St. John in New Brunswick, a route of 6,400km across Canada. Once built, 1.1 million barrels of oil are intended to flow through it every day.

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The Odds That the Beer You Drink Is Actually 'Craft' Are Getting Smaller and Smaller Each Year

When major beer label Budweiser announced they would rename their product “America” through the 2016 U.S. election, it raised droll hackles from a variety of observers. George Will suggested in the conservative National Review that the beer was less than fully American because it was produced by a foreign-owned firm, an irony also observed in the more liberal Washington Post. John Oliver’s HBO staff did what most US media did in 2016, and took the opportunity to give more TV time to the Trump campaign, in this case to mock Trump’s taking credit for the name change. Most commenters counted themselves clever for being aware the Bud label is foreign-owned, but all of them missed the real point: It’s not that “America” is foreign-owned, but that it’s owned by a brand-new global semi-monopoly that perfectly represents the power-mongering of neoliberal capitalism.

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In Legal Pot States, People Are Turning to Buds over Beer

A new industry study says access to legal marijuana is having a negative impact on beer sales. That's bad news for the brewing industry, but good news from a public health perspective.

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