Sex & Relationships

The Truth About Female Squirting

The nature of these genital geysers has been an ongoing debate.

Originally published by Van Winkle's, a new website dedicated to smarter sleep & wakefulness, published by Casper.

Both scientists and porn auteurs have spent decades arguing over the puzzling phenomenon known as female squirting. Between ten and 40 percent of women squirt during sex — near or during orgasm — but the nature of these genital geysers has been an ongoing debate.

Assorted theories characterize the libidinous liquid as an extra dose of lubrication or a byproduct of the female prostate, called the Skene’s glands. Others have proposed a somewhat less prosaic explanation: Squirting fluid is merely pee.

Team Urine, it seems, is correct.

In what must have been one of the most entertaining studies in recent years, seven French women — all seriously good sports — agreed to squirt for science. These subjects experienced “regular liquid expulsion during arousal or orgasm that was comparable with, at least, that of a glass of water, which abundantly wetted bed sheets.” Other than squirting, participants had no history of incontinence or other genito-urinary issues.

The women started by peeing in a cup, as to empty their bladders and produce urine samples for analysis. To make sure their bladders were in fact empty, researchers performed pelvic ultrasounds. The women then retreated to private rooms to masturbate, either with or without sex toys, or have sex with their partners. As instructed, participants alerted researchers once they felt sexually aroused.

At this point, researchers performed another ultrasound to assess any changes in the women’s previously empty bladders. Then, the women returned to their rooms and resumed activities — until they squirted. Condoms were used to prevent cross-fluid contamination.

Researchers collected and measured the fluid, and found it ranged in volume from 15 ml to 60 ml — that’s about a quarter-cup. (Participants confessed to experiencing more liquid in their private, non-scientific sex sessions.) Post-squirting, the subjects provided another urine sample and underwent a third and final ultrasound.

Both the pelvic ultrasounds and fluid analysis corroborated the pee theory. Though the women began their pleasure-sessions with empty bladders, they filled back up by the second ultrasound. Afterward, the third ultrasound revealed they were drained again. Additionally, the fluid was found to be nearly identical to pee, chemically speaking, with the addition of a small amount of prostate secretion in some subjects. Researchers attributed this to prostate stimulation during sexual activity. Contrary to previous reports, the key components of urine (urea, creatinine and uric acid) were not diluted in the fluid in question.

Based on this data, researchers concluded that female squirting is, essentially, involuntary urination triggered by orgasm or impending orgasm. It is a distinct phenomenon from female ejaculation.

Porn fetishists aside, not all squirters are pleased with their condition. As researchers noted, some women say squirting enhances their sex lives; others feel the opposite. Those in the latter camp should try to deplete their urinary wells before — and perhaps even during — sexual activity.

 

Sign Up!
Get AlterNet's Daily Newsletter in Your Inbox
+ sign up for additional lists
[x]
Select additional lists by selecting the checkboxes below before clicking Subscribe:
Activism
Drugs
Economy
Education
Election 2018
Environment
Food
Media
World