The Right Wing

Bonkers Poll: 70% of Republicans Think Trump Is a 'Good Role Model for Children'

Some party of family values.

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Seventy-two percent of Republicans believe that kids should try to follow Donald Trump’s example. That’s neither hyperbolic conjecture nor sarcastic speculation; it’s the truth, according to Republican poll respondents themselves. Between January 19-23, Quinnipiac University asked 1,245 voting-age adults if they think “Trump is a good role model for children,” and nearly three-quarters of self-identified Republicans responded in the affirmative. In essence, when asked whether America needs more racist narcissists with a fondness for bragging about sexual assault, Republicans overwhelmingly answered yes.

No other group so decidedly chose to land on the side of calamity and evil, though results were—as politics always are—tied to race. Overall, 99 percent of Democrats said kids shouldn’t look up to Trump, a man who arbitrarily brought up the size of his penis during a televised political debate and who in 1992 told New York magazine, "Women? You have to treat ’em like shit.” Ninety-seven percent of African Americans felt the prospect of more Trumps-in-training would be a bad thing, and 87 percent of Hispanics agreed with that assessment. But roughly a third of both white men and women, 32 and 37 percent respectively, said Trump is a good role model for America’s future leaders. Among white voters without a college degree, 54 percent see Trump as someone kids should respect and admire.

Those trends presented in other questions as well. Asked if Trump “has good leadership skills,” just 8 percent of black people, 16 percent of Hispanic people and 6 percent of Democrats said yes. In contrast, 46 percent of white people gave a thumbs-up to Trump’s leadership talents.

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Hypocrisy once again carried the day, according to the answers given by conservative respondents. For example, 89 percent of Republicans say it is “important to [them] that a president be loyal to their spouse.” Back in 1994, Trump openly referred to the period when he was juggling first wife Ivana and mistress Marla Maples as “a bowl of cherries.” This was years before he allegedly paid porn star Stormy Daniels $130,000 to keep quiet about an affair the two had four months after his third wife Melania gave birth. Still, Republicans expressed no ethical conflict between Trump’s extramarital behavior and their beliefs. Eighty percent of Republicans say Trump “provides the United States with moral leadership,” and 82 percent say he shares their values. (Presumably, 100 percent would answer “no one” if asked, “Who cares about selective outrage now that the president is white again?”)

Quinnipiac noted that overall, Trump got low marks from most groups, but white voters are sticking with him. Just 3 percent of black people and 13 percent of Hispanic people say they approve of the job Trump is doing in office. Overall, a historically low 36 percent of Americans overall, and 3 percent of Democrats, gave Trump’s presidency a thumbs-up. However, 47 percent of white men and 42 percent of white women say Trump is a good president. Nearly 40 percent of white male college graduates and one-third of white female graduates are happy with the job Trump is doing.

A few more general stats on how Trump rates with those surveyed by Quinnipiac overall, all of which are negative:

  • 60-35 percent that he is not honest;
  • 59-38 percent that he does not have good leadership skills;
  • 57-40 percent that he does not care about average Americans;
  • 65-30 percent that he is not level-headed;
  • 61-36 percent that he is a strong person;
  • 54-40 percent that he is intelligent;
  • 61-34 percent that he does not share their values.

The Quinnipiac survey in its entirety can be found online.

Kali Holloway is a senior writing fellow and the senior director of Make It Right, a project of the Independent Media Institute.