Campus Cops Brutalize Peaceful Students Protesting Tuition Hikes at UC Riverside

 Students at UC Riverside worried about past and future fee hikes attended a Regents meeting last Thursday to voice their concerns. However, despite the rights of attendees to a democratic, open-to-the-public meeting, students say they were summarily silenced—and that protesters outside the meeting were brutally attacked by police with batons and shot with non-lethal bullets—a point that went unmentioned in most reports, but one clearly backed up by video. Marc Lombardo, one of the student protesters in attendance, told AlterNet:

What events led up to shots being fired? As video documentation clearly shows, police were hitting protestors with batons without any clear tactical purpose. They were protecting no one. There was nowhere they needed to go. They simply started hitting the people peacefully assembled in front of them. Only at that point did protestors attempt to bring a barricade to the police line in order to protect those being assaulted by law enforcement. That’s when the police opened fire. These events can be seen here: 

 

On the day after the Regents’ Meeting, Jan 20, we took one of the persons shot by UC Police to the UC Riverside Health Center so that he could receive treatment for his injuries. He was denied service. In response, we marched to the administration building and demanded to speak with Chancellor White, who came out and spoke with us for approx. 20 minutes. Our comrade asked for the Chancellor to assist him in receiving care for his injuries from a health professional. Unfortunately, Chancellor White offered no real help for our comrade beyond suggesting that he could go to the emergency room (presumably at his own expense!) or a community clinic. Video of these events is here:  

The Daily Californian reports that two students were arrested on charges of police assault. Read more here.

AlterNet / By Julianne Escobedo Shepherd

Posted at January 23, 2012, 5:54am

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