Indiana Republican's Disgusting Smear of Rape Victims and Women

As the GOP attempts to obliterate women's right to choose nationwide, it's become increasingly clear that this isn't just about abortion -- it's about sending women back to the Victorian age, when we were allowed no agency and only pedestalized as virgins or vilified as whores. In those days, of course, the virginal woman was seen as being controllable, easing men's deep mistrust of our inherently nefarious motives or wiles or whatever the hell they thought. It was an absurd notion meant to keep us down, and revoltingly, it's seeping back into the culture, permeating the minds of hyper-conservatives and poisoning the political discourse.

Case in point: Indiana State Rep. Eric Turner, Republican, went on record Tuesday saying the state's abortion laws should not have loopholes, because, quote, "someone who is desirous of an abortion could simply say that they've been raped or there's incest."

Furthermore, he disparages a bill that would allow abortions in cases of rape or incest by saying that it does not specify how to obtain "confirmation" of that.

The woman-mistrusting misogyny in that one horrific statement is absurd -- it's as though he believes all women are scheming, immoral serpents plotting our next way to bilk the system. Indeed, it almost implies that he thinks we take rape or incest lightly -- a privilege or a concept to be utilized for gain -- rather than what they are -- horrific acts of sexual terror. 

Turner's anti-abortion bill asserts 'a compelling state interest in protecting the fetus,' and would force women seeking abortions to look at ultrasounds, along with restricting access after 20 weeks.

Here is video of his statement, via TPM. Hope you have a barf bag handy.

 

AlterNet / By Julianne Escobedo Shepherd

Posted at March 31, 2011, 5:59am

Sign Up!
Get AlterNet's Daily Newsletter in Your Inbox
+ sign up for additional lists
[x]
Select additional lists by selecting the checkboxes below before clicking Subscribe:
Activism
Drugs
Economy
Education
Election 2018
Environment
Food
Media
World