News & Politics

Donald Trump Can't Rest Easy with These Latest Poll Results

New data indicate the president's support is slipping with one of his key voting blocs.

Photo Credit: Albert H. Teich / Shutterstock

After less than 10 months in office, Donald Trump's approval rating hovers around 38 percent, the lowest at this juncture of any presidency since Gerald Ford's. The president has been dogged by persistent questions about his mental health and a collusion probe that seems to expand with each passing week. It's understandable, then, that liberals and progressives have come to hang on the latest poll results, hoping against hope that the newest nadir will finally break the spell cast over congressional Republicans and force them to take action, be it articles of impeachment or exercising the 25th Amendment.

Keep dreaming. 

According to Gallup, Trump's approval rating among Republicans is holding steady around 80 percent—certainly less than ideal, but not low enough to signal a revolt within the GOP. There are even indications that the party will embrace the president's authoritarianism for years to come, with Ed Gillespie striking a distinctly Trumpian tone (read: white supremacist) in the Virginia gubernatorial race.

Yet new data indicate that cracks are forming in Trump's base, if the foundation itself remains intact.

A new Reuters/Ipsos poll finds the president's approval rating in rural communities has sunk to 47 percent, down from 55 percent four weeks after he was elected. Of the 15,000 people surveyed, 47 percent now hold an unfavorable opinion of Trump, which represents an 8 percent spike over the same period. 

"The poll found that Trump has lost support in rural areas among men, whites and people who never went to college," Reuters reports. "He lost support with rural Republicans and rural voters who supported him on Election Day."

So what does this mean? In all likelihood, nothing for now. The president's most fervent supporters are typically affluent suburbanites, despite the mainstream media's elitist assumptions about the proletariat (although the white working-class did vote overwhelming in Trump's favor). And with Republicans controlling the House and Senate, it's highly unlikely Trump will be removed from office soon, if ever.

But neither is it out of the realm of possibility that Congress could move against him if these trendlines continue. And so the poll watch begins anew.

H/T Reuters

Jacob Sugarman is a managing editor at AlterNet.

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