News & Politics

Colbert Dismantles Trump's Pick of Unqualified 'Coma Patient' Ben Carson as Housing Secretary

Even the one thin pretext for this appointment turns out not to be true.

Photo Credit: Screen Capture

"Late Show" host Stephen Colbert is getting a kick out of president-elect Trump's strategy for appointing Cabinet members. For weeks, Trump has been busy filling his Cabinet, when he's not on his "thank-you" tour or taking congratulatory (and controversial) calls from foreign leaders. 

“Today, he named former neurosurgeon and current coma patient Ben Carson to be Secretary of Housing and Urban Development,” Colbert announced. “This is surprising because, just a few weeks ago, Carson made it clear he wasn’t qualified to run a federal agency."

"Dr. Carson feels he has no government experience; he's never run a federal agency. The last thing he would want to do was take a position that could cripple the presidency," Carson's business manager and close friend Armstrong Williams told The Hill on November 15, despite Carson running for president just this year.

Nearly a month later, however, Carson did accept a position in the Trump administration—Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

"Today, Carson's spokesman explained that he is perfect for Housing and Urban Development because, ‘He did spend part of his childhood in public housing,'" Colbert revealed. 

However, Armstrong Williams has since confirmed that Mr. Carson never lived in government housing, a correction made to the New York Times article just after the show aired. 

Still, Trump has a few more appointments to make, and Colbert doubts anyone with a shred of relevant experience will fill the slots. 

"Get ready for our next Surgeon General," he mused. "Someone who has been to the doctor!”

Watch:

Alexandra Rosenmann is an AlterNet associate editor. Follow her @alexpreditor.

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