Economy

This Is What Thanksgiving for the 1% Looks Like

The most expensive Thanksgiving dinner reported in America costs $50,000.

Photo Credit: OLEG CHEMEN / Shutterstock

This year, America's most expensive Thanksgiving dinner is priced at $50,000, up $15,000 from two years ago, when four Americans shelled out for the feast. 

“It’s a lifetime experience, but it might take you a lifetime to pay back the money,” said Marc Sherry, co-owner of the Old Homestead Steakhouse in Manhattan's meatpacking district, where the meal is served. The steakhouse has been serving the decadent meal since 1968. 

In addition to holiday staples like turkey and sides, the $50,000 package also includes "four prime seating tickets to the iconic Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a holiday shopping spree at Saks Fifth Avenue, Bergdorf Goodman and Henri Bendel, four tickets on the 50-yard line to any New York Giants home game for the remainder of this season or next, a horse-drawn carriage ride through Central Park, a one-night stay in a luxury suite at the Waldorf-Astoria, a guided tour around the city, and a stretch-limousine that will transport guests between activities," Inside Edition reported

"I promise you, it will be more opulent and decadent than the lobby in Trump Tower," Sherry insisted. 

It's a far cry from the $50 the average American will spend on a whole meal, about $5 per person

Old Homestead isn't the only New York restaurant offering a five-figure feast this holiday. The St. Regis announced its $20,000 dinner package just days before Old Homestead upped its price. 

So, compared to these two, the $495 turkey dinner from Neiman Marcus sounds like a sweet deal. The meal ships directly to you, so the 1% can look forward to a $50 green bean casserole arriving at their doorstep.

Alexandra Rosenmann is an AlterNet associate editor. Follow her @alexpreditor.

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