Activism

After the March: 10 Actions to Take in Trump's First 100 Days

The fight against Trumpism has only just begun.

Photo Credit: Screen Capture / YouTube

On Saturday we marched. On Monday, the work continues. While the pundits of the world were wringing their hands over the limits of protest, and whether anti-Trump Americans can harness the defiant joy of the marches into sustained activism and electoral change, the Women's March organizers were one step ahead. Just as many of us boarded buses back home Saturday night, information about next steps flowed to inboxes and social media feeds. Yes, the powerhouse activists who crammed a year's worth of organizing into two months, had launched an action campaign for the first 100 days of Trump's presidency: 10 Actions for the First 100 Days.

As the march's website notes, "now is not the time to hang up our marching shoes—it’s time to get our friends, family and community together and make history." To that end, they're posting one action every ten days on a particular issue. The first action is broad, a postcard campaign to our senators explaining what matters most to us, and what their constituents are demanding in order to consider voting for them again. To ensure consistency, there's a template everyone can print, personalize, and send to senators. 

It's simple, and perhaps an action that those activists who have been calling, writing, and visiting their representatives already, following the template of the Indivisible Guide or Call the Halls may see as old news. However, it's an important first step for the hundreds of thousands of women for whom the march was only a first step, a coordinated campaign they can get involved in. The best way to keep these newbies involved is to start small. Today a postcard, tomorrow Capitol Hill. 

 

Ilana Novick is an AlterNet contributing writer and production editor.

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