'Highest price tag': FBI official explains why Trump may have kept docs pertaining to foreign nuclear secrets

'Highest price tag':  FBI official explains why Trump may have kept docs pertaining to foreign nuclear secrets
Former President Donald Trump speaking at the 2022 Student Action Summit at the Tampa Convention Center in Tampa, Florida (Gage Skidmore)
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A former Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) official is shedding light on the reason why he believes former President Donald Trump may have wanted to keep classified documents in his possession.

On Wednesday, September 7, former FBI assistant director Frank Figliuzzi discussed the case with MSNBC's Stephanie Ruhle. During his appearance, Ruhle asked why Trump may have found it beneficial to store information about a foreign country's nuclear secrets.

Figliuzzi weighed in with his perspective and insisted that the former president might have done so for potential financial gain.

READ MORE: Donald Trump's ex-aides think there are 'more highly classified documents' at other Trump properties

"If I were to be asked what the highest price tag or highest value might be on what kind of classified US government information, certainly among the top of my answers would be: nuclear-related information," he said.

He went on to further explain why that type of sensitive documentation has "potentially the greatest value" if anyone were to try to "market it and capitalize" on access to such information.

"Well, first, a country would give its right arm to learn what the US knew about its nuclear program and capabilities, not only for the obvious reason of, 'Hey, they figured this out,' but also because it would signal what we don't know about their program," Figliuzzi said.

"Secondly, let's move to that country's adversary. They would give their left and right arms to find out what their adversary is doing in terms of nuclear capability," he added.

READ MORE: Ex-Trump DoD official reportedly vowed to publish classified documents

Business Insider also highlighted: "Aside from the value of the information, Figliuzzi noted that the files were also located at Mar-a-Lago, which Figliuzzi said had 'some of the lowest security you can imagine' with foreign nationals 'traipsing in and out.'"

Figliuzzi's remarks follow similar responses from other FBI officials who also believe that foreign nationals may have attempted to gain access to the documents stored at Mar-a-Lago.

READ MORE: Donald Trump's ex-aides think there are 'more highly classified documents' at other Trump properties

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