'Rightwing and even-righter-wing': New analysis lays out the distinct problem within the GOP amid primary elections​

'Rightwing and even-righter-wing': New analysis lays out the distinct problem within the GOP amid primary elections​
Trump/Shutterstock
Trump/Shutterstock

Primary elections are in full swing and it appears there is a growing trend sweeping the nation. Although Republicans are supposed to be going to war with Democrats, one op-ed is explaining how the political party appears to be at war with itself.

Lloyd Green, a New York attorney who previously served as opposition research counsel for former President George H.W. Bush’s 1988 campaign and in the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) from 1990 to 1992, offered a brief assessment of how the primary election results are painting a relatively grim picture for Republicans.

As former President Donald Trump continues to wreak havoc by endorsing candidates that align with his own political agenda, the Republican Party could face long-term suffering due to intraparty division. Green noted a number of examples where this appears to be the case and how the elections have become more of a battle between the "rightwing and even-righter-wing."

From Tedd Budd and J.D. Vance's victories to Dr. Mehmet Oz hanging on by a thread as he battles it out with anti-MAGA Republican candidate Kathy Barnette, Trump is still managing to maintain some semblance of political influence. But, despite the slight edge the former president appears to have in some states, it's not the case everywhere.

In Idaho, Trump-endorsed candidate Janice McGeachin fell short of victory. Over in North Carolina, freshmen congressman Rep. Madison Cawthorn (R-N.C.) was knocked out of the midterm election after being beaten by a challenger in the primary.

As for the Pennsylvania gubernatorial race, Doug Mastriano may be the Republican nominee, but for many members of the party, that isn't exactly a good thing. "Douglas Mastriano is now the Republican gubernatorial candidate. Unlike Oz and McCormick, Mastriano truly believes the Maga message," Green wrote. "It is a tenet of faith. As a candidate, he championed Christian nationalism, espoused election denialism, and flipped the bird at efforts to curb Covid’s spread."

He also added, "Fittingly, Mastriano attended the 6 January rally. He and his wife watched as a rioter stormed a police barricade. They did not enter the building, but the House select committee has subpoenaed him. The fact that Mastriano recently attended a Qanon rally did not deter the Republican Governors Association from eventually backing him."

Green also noted how Mastriano is a prime example of the type of candidate that makes Republicans apprehensive about the future. "Mastriano makes some Pennsylvania Republicans nervous," he noted. "They predict his presence may cost the Republican party control of the governor’s mansion and the Senate."

#story_page_post_article

Understand the importance of honest news ?

So do we.

The past year has been the most arduous of our lives. The Covid-19 pandemic continues to be catastrophic not only to our health - mental and physical - but also to the stability of millions of people. For all of us independent news organizations, it’s no exception.

We’ve covered everything thrown at us this past year and will continue to do so with your support. We’ve always understood the importance of calling out corruption, regardless of political affiliation.

We need your support in this difficult time. Every reader contribution, no matter the amount, makes a difference in allowing our newsroom to bring you the stories that matter, at a time when being informed is more important than ever. Invest with us.

Make a one-time contribution to Alternet All Access, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you.

Click to donate by check.

DonateDonate by credit card
Donate by Paypal
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}