Former White House aide says Trump campaign documents were destroyed or hidden from investigators

Former White House advisor Omarosa Manigault-Newman appeared on MSBNC to discuss the Mueller Report with host Craig Melvin. The often controversial former White House Communications aide is again making news, telling Melvin White House officials made it clear they did not want Manigault-Newman and others from the Trump campaign to share evidence with investigators.


In the segment below, she said, “We should really not just focus on what he is telling people to do or say, but how he's asked people to destroy documents, to destroy e-mails, in my case two boxes of campaign-related materials the white house still has in their possession that they claim they don't have or don't know what happened to it.”

She clarified to Melvin that Trump himself did not directly order her to hide evidence, but that White House officials made it very clear they did not want this evidence to see the light of day. This most certainly seems like something Rep. Elijah Cummings and Rep. Jerry Nadler might be interested in and Manigault-Newman said she did expect to get called to testify to Congress. Make it so!

Watch Manigault-Newman describe the boxes she says the White House never made available to investigators. Key transcript below.



MANIGAULT-NEWMAN: It's simple. He wants to run down the clock and thinks people will stop being concerned about it.

We should really not just focus on what he is telling people to do or say, but how he's asked people to destroy documents, to destroy e-mails, in my case two boxes of campaign-related materials the white house still has in their possession that they claim they don't have or don't know what happened to it.

MELVIN: What was in the boxes?

MANIGAULT-NEWMAN: All e-mails related to the campaign that I'm sure Congress will be as interested as the Mueller team was.

MELVIN: Were you ever told or encouraged to destroy potential evidence?

MANIGAULT-NEWMAN: I wasn't told directly but they were very clear about not wanting us to share those things. Right after the campaign, the day after, they took our e-mails down and told us we had no access to it. Wouldn't even allow us to get lists off. They were certainly working to try to hide the things we now know are involved with this investigation.

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