Federal Judge Knocks Down Part of Trump Ally's Scheme to Purge Voter Rolls

Though President Donald Trump's bogus Commission on Election Integrity based on his fabricated claim that millions of people voted illegally against him in 2016 is now defunct, the commission's leader, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, remains committed to restricting the American people's ability to vote.


But on Friday night, a federal judge blocked the implementation of Kobach's "Crosscheck" system that would automatically purge voter rolls of supposedly ineligible voters in Indiana.

The Indiana Senate Enrolled Act 442 was passed to use the system to eliminate voters from the rolls who are registered in other states. Advocates such as the ACLU and Common Cause Indiana argued that the law had the potential to unjustly remove legitimate voters from the rolls, especially because the legislation allowed election officials to unregister people without prior notification. 

U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt agreed with those advocates in a ruling Friday night, as Reuters first reported. She argued in favor of "allowing eligible voters to exercise their right to vote without being disenfranchised without notice."

Voter fraud, it must be said, is exceedingly rare in the United States, so efforts such as Kobach's are likely to kick off many more legitimate voters from the rolls than the number of fraudulent votes they prevent. Indeed blocking certain voters from exercising their rights appears to be the purpose of such efforts, despite claims to the contrary.

“Hoosier-elected officials should do all that they can to promote voter engagement,” Jane Heneger, executive director of ACLU of Indiana, said in a statement obtained by Reuters. “Today’s ruling condemns actions to the contrary that threaten to suppress the vote. Voting is our constitutional right and we must ensure every voice is heard.”

Enjoy this piece?

… then let us make a small request. AlterNet’s journalists work tirelessly to counter the traditional corporate media narrative. We’re here seven days a week, 365 days a year. And we’re proud to say that we’ve been bringing you the real, unfiltered news for 20 years—longer than any other progressive news site on the Internet.

It’s through the generosity of our supporters that we’re able to share with you all the underreported news you need to know. Independent journalism is increasingly imperiled; ads alone can’t pay our bills. AlterNet counts on readers like you to support our coverage. Did you enjoy content from David Cay Johnston, Common Dreams, Raw Story and Robert Reich? Opinion from Salon and Jim Hightower? Analysis by The Conversation? Then join the hundreds of readers who have supported AlterNet this year.

Every reader contribution, whatever the amount, makes a tremendous difference. Help ensure AlterNet remains independent long into the future. Support progressive journalism with a one-time contribution to AlterNet, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you. Click here to donate by check.

Close
alternet logo

Tough Times

Demand honest news. Help support AlterNet and our mission to keep you informed during this crisis.