White House and Nikki Haley Are Publicly Feuding About Whether She Was 'Confused' on Russia Sanctions

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley is now publicly feuding with the White House after officials told the press she had been "confused" when she announced Sunday that new sanctions against Russia would be revealed Monday.


“With all due respect, I don't get confused,” Haley said in a statement to Fox News.

White House officials began telling news outlets that Haley had been "confused" after the administration faced criticism for its shifting position. Haley had said on Sunday that the administration would levy new sanctions against Russia at the beginning of this week for supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his chemical warfare.

While President Donald Trump's decision to go on the attack in Syria last weekend was seen as a divergence from his excessively friendly stance toward Russia, many believed he was returning to form on Monday when the administration backtracked on the sanctions Haley had announced.

Larry Kudlow, Trump's top economic adviser, told reporters on Tuesday, "She got ahead of the curve."

He continued: “She’s a very effective ambassador, but there might have been some momentary confusion about that.”

Haley's pointed response leaves the White House facing the same uncomfortable questions it found itself facing on Monday. If Haley wasn't confused when she announced the sanctions on Sunday, what changed such that by Monday, no sanctions were implemented? Why can't the Trump administration develop a coherent and consistent approach toward dealing with Russia?

Enjoy this piece?

… then let us make a small request. AlterNet’s journalists work tirelessly to counter the traditional corporate media narrative. We’re here seven days a week, 365 days a year. And we’re proud to say that we’ve been bringing you the real, unfiltered news for 20 years—longer than any other progressive news site on the Internet.

It’s through the generosity of our supporters that we’re able to share with you all the underreported news you need to know. Independent journalism is increasingly imperiled; ads alone can’t pay our bills. AlterNet counts on readers like you to support our coverage. Did you enjoy content from David Cay Johnston, Common Dreams, Raw Story and Robert Reich? Opinion from Salon and Jim Hightower? Analysis by The Conversation? Then join the hundreds of readers who have supported AlterNet this year.

Every reader contribution, whatever the amount, makes a tremendous difference. Help ensure AlterNet remains independent long into the future. Support progressive journalism with a one-time contribution to AlterNet, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you. Click here to donate by check.

Close