‘Take that Down!’: Watch Fox Host Panic after Graphic Shows Fox News Is Least Trusted Network

In what was undoubtedly a painful moment on Fox News this morning, media analyst Howard Kurtz frantically implored his producer to take down a graphic that showed Fox is the least trusted of the big three cable networks.


Speaking with pollster Frank Luntz about Donald Trump’s Twitter habits, with Luntz calling the president’s use of “fake news” detrimental to his cause, Kurtz brought up a recent poll from Monmouth University on news trustworthiness.

That is when things took a hilarious turn.

“Speaking of fake news, there is a new poll out from Monmouth University.’Do the media report fake news regularly or occasionally?’ 77 percent say yes,” Kurtz exclaimed before noticing the graphic instead showed “Who do you trust more?” with CNN at 48 percent, MSNBC at 45 percent and Fox News bring up the rear at 30 percent.

“That is not the graphic we are looking for. Hold off,” the Fox News host protested before pleading, “Take that down, please.”

Kurtz later came back to the graphic, to put it in context, but Fox News still came up short in credibility behind CNN and MSNBC as the numbers showed.

Watch the video below via Fox News on Twitter:

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