Trump Wants Revenge: His Hunger to Be President Is All About Gaining Power to Settle Petty Personal Scores

Increasingly, the evidence is pointing to a certain conclusion: Donald Trump is running for president because he believes the power and fame of the White House will allow him to settle the score in his ever-expanding list of petty grievances.


Sure, there are other things he likes about it, like the attention and the opportunity to slap the word “Trump” in gold lettering across the front of the desk in the Oval Office, are motivating factors. But for those who have been following the campaign closely, it’s hard to ignore the fact that Trump spends much, perhaps most of his time, honing an enemies' list of people he imagines have personally slighted him and fantasizing out loud about putting them and anyone he associates with them in their place.

Farah Stockman and Keith Bradsher of the New York Times published a piece Monday detailing a major grudge that Trump holds against a group of Chinese investors that helped save him from a financial crisis in the ’90s. He made a lucrative deal with this group of Hong Kong billionaires to sell them the Bank of America building on Avenue of the Americas, allowing him 30% of the profits and paying him feeds to develop the building. In 2005, they sold the building for $1.76 billion.

“Although it was believed to be the largest residential real estate transaction in the city’s history,” Stockman and Bradsher write, “Mr. Trump was furious, and contends to this day that his partners did not consult him first.”

Trump claims he was mad because he thinks he could have gotten a better deal, a claim that’s even those completely ignorant of real estate economics can see is self-serving nonsense. Still, he sued the men who had saved him from financial ruin, making wild accusations and tying them up in court for years.

He lost the lawsuit, but now runs around telling audiences he won it, portraying the portion of the building he owns, which was what he settled for after his loss, as if he “got from China in a war.”

He mentions this deal, pretending he won when he lost, during his many campaign tirades portraying China as some kind of economic predator that will stop at nothing to destroy the American economy, saying, “we are being ripped so badly by China” and that they are out to “rape our country” and that our trade deficit is “the greatest theft in the history of the world”.

It’s a bizarre obsession, but this New York Times story suggests that his paranoia could be the direct result of his personal vendetta against a group of Hong Kong billionaires that he sued because he wasn’t asked to sit in on their sales meetings.

It may sound like a stretch to say that a man would attack an entire country of people because he felt like a handful of businessmen snubbed him, but this is hardly the first story that has come out linking Trump’s bizarre political conspiracy theories to personal grudges he holds.

As Andres Oppenheimer of the Miami Herald reported in April, Trump has similar sour grapes about a business deal in Mexico:

The three-tower, 25-story luxury Trump Ocean Resort Baja Mexico condo-hotel project by the Trump Organization and the Irongate real estate company was originally announced in 2006. Two years later, the project ran into financial trouble, and Trump removed his name from it. By 2009, the project was effectively suspended, and angry investors sued.

Trump said that he had merely licensed his name to the project, and had not been involved in building it. In November 2013, after more than four years of litigation, Trump—who often says, “I never settle lawsuits”—settled one lawsuit by about 100 would-be condo buyers, The Los Angeles Times reported at the time.

It’s not the only time that Trump has engaged in this unsavory practice of licensing his name to other developers to trick people into thinking they are investing with him instead of someone whose name they don’t know. But what’s interesting about this is that Trump’s bitterness over having to settle this lawsuit seems to have spilled over into his opinions about Mexico itself, causing him to demonize the entire country and everyone who lives in it.

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