Is the Seafood You Eat Caught by Slaves? Meet the Pulitzer Favorites Who Broke Open a Global Scandal (Video)

Is seafood on the menu tonight? Well, there’s a chance it might have been caught by a slave.


That’s what the Associated Press uncovered when reporters traveled to the remote island of Benjina, Indonesia. They found workers trapped in cages, whipped with toxic stingray tails for punishment, and forced to work 22 hours a day for almost no compensation.

We speak to two of the Associated Press reporters who broke this remarkable story, Robin McDowell and Martha Mendoza.

We caught up with them last week in Los Angeles just before they headed to the University of Southern California to receive the 2016 Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting for this remarkable series.

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