Watch: Liz Warren in Action: 5 Key Areas Where She's Taking a Bold Stand

Elizabeth Warren, the senior United States senator from Massachusetts, has made headlines recently for lambasting Trump while refusing to endorse either Democratic candidate. However, Warren has a much large agenda of issues she advocates for that often go under the radar.


Here are five recent initiatives Warren is leading that you may not know about.

1. Getting money out of politics.

Last Sunday, Senator Warren joined Real Time with Bill Maher to discuss the campaign finance and the 2016 election. 

“Somehow, as bad as we thought Citizens United was, it’s actually even worse,” Maher said. 

“I think you’re exactly right about that," Warren agreed. "Sheldon Adelson [the 18th richest person in the world] is out there and he gets to pick the candidates and then see if he can’t get those offices, the senators, the White House. This is just crazy."

2. Stopping bank failures before they happen.

At a United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, Elizabeth Warren met Janet Yellen, Chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to conduct a hearing on the "Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to the Congress.”

“As you know, Dodd Frank requires giants financial institutions to submit living wills. These are the documents that describe. This describes how these banks could be liquidated in a rapid and orderly fashion in bankruptcy,” Warren began. "But in August 2014, the Fed and the FDIC found problems with the living wills submitted by the 11 biggest banks in this country. And according to the FDIC, all 11 of those wills were not credible. The Fed agreed there were problems but refused to make any determinations about whether the wills met the legal standard of credibility. Now that mattered a lot because it’s only a joint determination by the agencies that has any legal force. Why did the fed refuse to join the FDIC and designate these plans not incredible?” Warren asked Yellen.

3. Building a multinational coalition to defeat ISIL.

“Some military experts say in order to defeat this enemy and destroy its command and control center specifically, that that will require boots on the ground. So would you support American troops being deployed to Syria,” Katie Couric asked Elizabeth Warren.

Warren said, “The point right now is that we are working, and should be working, much more with all of the nations that have an interest in ending ISIS. And there will be different roles for different parties in this, but we can’t say, 'We’re the one’s that are going to come in and do this by ourselves.’ We need to work with others.” 

4. Helping young mothers get an education.

Sen. Warren recently congratulated the Care Center on 30 years of supporting young mothers and discussed her own experience seeking higher education as a young mother.

“My own path to a college diploma was pretty checkered,” Warren admitted. “I wanted to be a teacher and that meant I needed a college diploma. So I borrowed money, I married young and then I dropped out of school. I went back, but I got lucky.”

Warren and her daughter Amelia Tyagi co-authored the 2003 book, The Two-Income Trap: Why Middle-Class Mothers and Fathers Are Going Broke.

 

5. Overhauling retirement planning.

Sen. Warren spoke at the Department of Labor's announcement of a new Conflict of Interest rule for retirement advisers on April 6, 2016.

“We are facing a retirement crisis in this country. Today, the struggle to build retirement security will get just a little bit easier for millions of Americans. Anyone who goes to a retirement advisor for help in investing their savings will meet an advisor who by law must recommend products that are in the customer’s best interest. Period."

 

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