Miami Cop Pulled 5-Year-Old’s Ear and Marched Him to Squad Car in Handcuffs After School Fight Over Toy

A Miami police officer was suspended from duty after he reportedly yanked a 5-year-old boy’s ear and handcuffed him at school.


According to Miami’s Local10.com, parent Hector Feliciano said that Officer Paul Gourrier of the Miami Police Department seized his son by the ear and then handcuffed his hands behind his back after the boy bit another child in a dispute over a toy.

The incident took place on Feb. 9 and was the latest in a series of clashes between the two boys. Teacher Michelle Svayg took the child to guidance counselor Margarita Fernandez’ office for a meeting with the counselor Officer Gourrier.

Fernandez told police that the boy continued to misbehave in her office, treating the disciplinary meeting “as if everything was a joke.”

The counselor claims that she did not see the officer pull the boy’s ear, but that Gourrier asked the boy if he knew what would happen to him if he continued to attack other students.

When the child replied that he did not, Gourrier reportedly said, “Let me show you. I’m going to show you what happens so that you can understand.”

The officer put the boy in handcuffs and walked him out of the office, Fernandez said. When they returned in about two minutes, she said, the boy was no longer handcuffed.

A school security guard said that the officer marched the 5-year-old to the school’s main entrance and pointed to his police cruiser, explaining that if the child got into trouble for bothering other students again, he would go to jail.

Gourrier admits to handcuffing the child and “tugging” his ear to get his attention.

Hector Feliciano maintains that the school had no right to treat his son like an adult criminal. He told Channel 10 that if the school had informed him of the discipline issues, he would have handled them at home.

An internal investigation regarding Gourrier’s conduct followed and he has was suspended from duties without pay for 20 hours in June.

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