Bill O’Reilly: Seeing Kids Watch ‘Garbage’ Like Beyoncé Videos ‘Just Breaks My Heart’

Fox News host Bill O’Reilly couldn’t seem to keep his train of thought together during an interview with contributor Ben Carson on Tuesday, as he conflated singer Beyoncé with “gangster rappers” and professional athletes, in video posted by Media Matters.


“You remember Jackie Robinson and Willie Mays. Weren’t they fabulous athletes — I idolized Willie Mays,” O’Reilly told Carson. “And what do we have now? What do we have now? Gangster rappers, you know, Beyoncé. The most famous, you know, doing these videos that show these kinds of things to young, 9, 10, 11-year-old girls? I mean — and it’s celebrated. It’s celebrated. You know, that’s the big change.”

O’Reilly has accused the singer in the past of promoting irresponsible sexuality among teenage girls. But he has consistently failed to mention data indicating that teenagers are actually having less sex and that birthrates among teen girls has declined.

This past Sunday, Beyoncé capped a performance at the MTV Music Awards by appearing onstage alongside her husband, rapper and sports agent Jay-Z, and their daughter, Blue Ivy Carter. The performance also drew attention for Beyoncé’s choice to appear in front of a large sign bearing the word “FEMINIST,” as seen in a photo posted byBuzzfeed:

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On Tuesday, Carson suggested that the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s gave way to a mentality where Black Americans were “patted on the head” and not encouraged to work hard.

“The bottom line is, we as a society must come to understand that this is a problem that affects all of us,” Carson said. “And we don’t have to wait for Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton or anybody to be the leader on this issue. And it doesn’t even have to be a Black person. I appreciate the fact that you’re willing to step out and talk about this because it is politically incorrect to do so now.”

“Well, it just breaks my heart,” O’Reilly responded. “It breaks my heart as a former teacher [who] had a lot of African-American students to see this kind of garbage. And by the time the kid’s 12 or 13, they’re almost gone. And I’m just so tired of it.”

Watch the discussion, as posted by Media Matters, below.

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