Read Obama's Eloquent Takedown Of The NRA And Congressional Inaction After More Gun Violence

On Tuesday, President Obama made a forceful and eloquent statement about Congress's failure to stop America's epidemic of gun violence. Here is the statement in its entirely, as transcribed by the White House press pool.


"I have to say that people often ask me, you know, how’s it been being president and, you know, what are my -- you know, what am I proudest of and what are my biggest disappointments? And you know, I've got 2 1/2 years left. My biggest frustration so far is the fact that this society has not been willing to take some basic steps to keep guns out of the hands of, you know, people who, you know, can do just unbelievable damage.

"We're the only developed country on Earth where this happens. And it happens now once a week. And it's a one-day story. There's no place else like this.

"A couple of decades ago Australia had a mass shooting similar to Columbine orNewtown, and Australia just said, “well, that's it. We're not doing, we're not seeing that again,” and basically imposed very severe, tough gun laws, and they haven't had a mass shooting since. I mean, our levels of gun violence are off the charts. There's no advanced, developed country on Earth that would put up with this.

"Now, we have a different tradition. We have a Second Amendment. We have historically respected gun rights. I respect gun rights.

"But the idea that, for example, we couldn't even get a background check bill in to make sure that if you're going to buy a weapon you have to actually go through a fairly rigorous process so that we know who you are, so you can't just walk up to a store and buy a semi-automatic weapon? It makes no sense.

"And I don't know if anybody saw the brief press conference from the father of the young man who had been killed at Santa Barbara -- and as a father myself I just, I could not understand the pain he must be going through and just theprimal scream that he gave out. Why aren't we doing something about this? And I will tell you that I have been in Washington for a while now and most things don't surprise me. The fact that 20 six-year-olds were gunned down in the most violent fashion possible and this town couldn't do anything about it was stunning to me. And so the question then becomes, what can we do about it?

"The only thing that's going to change is public opinion. If public opinion does not demand change in Congress, it will not change. I've initiated over 20 executive actions to try to tighten up some of the rules and the laws, but the bottomline is, is that we don't have enough tools right now to really make as big of a dent as we need to.

"And most members of Congress -- and I have to say to some degree this is bipartisan -- are terrified of the NRA. The combination of, you know, the NRA and gun manufacturers are very well financed and have the capacity to move votes inlocal elections and congressional elections. And so if you're running for office right now, that's where you feel the heat. And people on the other side may be generally favorable towards things like background checks and other common-sense rules, but they're not as motivated, so that doesn't end up being the issue that a lot of you vote on.

"And until that changes, until there is a fundamental shift in public opinion inwhich people say, ‘enough; this is not acceptable; this is not normal; this isn't, sort of, the price we should be paying for our freedom; that we can have respect for the Second Amendment, and responsible gun owners and sportsmen and hunters can have, you know, the ability to possess weapons, but that we aregoing to, you know, put some common-sense rules in place that make a dent, at least, in what's happening’ -- until that is not just the majority view – ‘cause that's already the majority view, even the majority of gun owners believe that -- but until that's a view that people feel passionately about and are willing to go after folks who don't, you know, vote reflecting those values -- until that happens, sadly, not much is going to change.

"Last thing I'll say: A lot of people will say that, you know, “well, this is a mental health problem. You know, it's not a gun problem.” You know, the United States does not have a monopoly on crazy people. It's not the only country that has psychosis. And yet, we kill each other in these mass shootings at ratesthat are exponentially higher than any place else. Well, what's the difference? The difference is, is that these guys can stack up a bunch of ammunition intheir houses. And that's sort of par for the course.

"So the country has to do some soul-searching about this. This is becoming the norm. And we take it for granted in ways that, as a parent, are terrifying to me. And I am prepared to work with anybody, including responsible sportsmen and gun owners, to craft some solutions. But right now,  it's not even possible to get even the mildest restrictions through Congress. And we should be ashamed of that."

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