Katrina Recovery 'Activist' Outs Himself as FBI Spy

A Katrina relief worker has just outed himself as an FBI mole, and the two men Brandon Darby accuses of planning subversive activity at the RNC have been in federal detention in Minnesota since the convention. They have also been denied bail and face decades in prison -- Minnesota's near-Senator Al Franken should look into that.


Note to those trying to rebuild the City of New Orleans, if one of your volunteers turns off the radio every time the Dixie Chicks come on, wears a three piece suit to human rights rallies, storms out of the confession part of the Frost Versus Nixon, or puts invisible quote marks around the word "war crimes," you might be infiltrated by some one more interested in busting protesters than helping rebuild a city brought to its knees by massive federal levee failures.

In an open letter, Darby defended wearing a wire while working at Common Ground with: "It is very dangerous when a few individuals engage in or act on a belief system in which they feel they know the real truth and that all others are ignorant and therefore have no right to meet and express their political views." Which would explain invading Iraq on trumped up intelligence but that's probably not where he was going with this missive.

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