Are Cities Warming Up to 'Don't Ask Don't Tell' Immigration Policies?

In an interesting update to the ongoing national debate over police officers enforcing immigration law (and to Feet in 2 Worlds' reporting on the issue), Hartford, CT's City Council voted unanimously Monday to prohibit all city workers, including police officers, from asking about residents' immigration status except in criminal cases and from turning over undocumented immigrants to federal authorities solely due to their lack of legal status.

The local ordinance, which must still be approved by Mayor Eddie Perez, also bars city employees from asking residents about their immigration status as they access city services.

Perez says he supports the idea behind the resolution, but it's still not clear if he will approve it: in the past he's cited a policy (issued by Hartford Chief of Police Daryl Roberts in March 2008 that allows officers to only inquire about the immigration status of those involved in a criminal investigation) as enough to encourage city residents to cooperate with police.

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