Acquitted of Murder, Neo-Nazi Killer Taunts Victim's Family

Even by the twisted standards of the neo-Nazi underworld, Hardy Lloyd is one sick individual. The 30-year-old skinhead, who describes himself as the "doctor of all hate," was kicked out of the ultra-violent World Church of the Creator in 2003 after he was involuntarily committed to a mental hospital. "I do not believe killing is wrong," Lloyd wrote in 2004. "Our new religion must be the worship of death and murder."

Later that year, Lloyd (right) was arrested for murder after he killed his girlfriend. The victim, 41-year-old Lori Hann, was a divorced legal secretary who met Lloyd through an Internet dating service. Lloyd admitted shooting Hann in the face during an argument over another woman, but claimed that she'd threatened him with a handgun minutes earlier and that he fired in self-defense.

Prosecutors argued that Hann was gunned down in the street while running for help (she'd pulled over her car and gotten out in front of a stranger's house with Lloyd in the passenger seat), and pointed out that Hann was unarmed when Lloyd shot her (Hann's handgun was found in her vehicle). Nevertheless, a jury in November 2006 acquitted Lloyd of first-degree murder and voluntary manslaughter, finding him guilty only of carrying a firearm without a license.

Narrowly escaping a murder conviction has done nothing to dampen Lloyd's enthusiasm for celebrating violence, including mass murder, on his "Universal Fascism" website, on which he encourages fascists of all colors to unite and kill Jews. But in recent weeks he's sunken to a new sadistic low by taunting Hann's loved ones and bragging about ending her life by posting lyrics to his own sadistic versions of hit pop songs and gangsta rap singles.

Last Dec. 22, for example, Lloyd posted the lyrics to "'Bitch Killer,' as sung by Hardy Lloyd," a take on rapper Ice-T's controversial 1992 single "Cop Killer." Here's a sampling of the lyrics:

ACLU By ACLUSponsored

Imagine you've forgotten once again the difference between a gorilla and a chimpanzee, so you do a quick Google image search of “gorilla." But instead of finding images of adorable animals, photos of a Black couple pop up.

Is this just a glitch in the algorithm? Or, is Google an ad company, not an information company, that's replicating the discrimination of the world it operates in? How can this discrimination be addressed and who is accountable for it?

“These platforms are encoded with racism," says UCLA professor and best-selling author of Algorithms of Oppression, Dr. Safiya Noble. “The logic is racist and sexist because it would allow for these kinds of false, misleading, kinds of results to come to the fore…There are unfortunately thousands of examples now of harm that comes from algorithmic discrimination."

On At Liberty this week, Dr. Noble joined us to discuss what she calls “algorithmic oppression," and what needs to be done to end this kind of bias and dismantle systemic racism in software, predictive analytics, search platforms, surveillance systems, and other technologies.

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