Bush Throws a Bone to Working Families

Here's a snippet from George W. Bush's weekly radio address on Saturday in which he tries to tell hourly workers that there's cause for economic joy this holiday season:


"America's working families also received another bit of holiday cheer this week: We learned that real hourly wages rose by 2.3 percent over the past year. That may not sound like a lot, but for the typical family of four with both parents working, it means an extra $1,350 for this year. At the same time, our growing economy continues to create jobs and that has brought unemployment down to just 4.5 percent. These numbers give all Americans a reason to celebrate: More people are working than ever before, and paychecks are going further than they used to."
It's a good thing the Hypocrite-in-Chief used a relative phrase like "…paychecks going farther than they used to" or he would be lying yet again. The fact is, the buying power of the minimum wage is at its lowest point in 50 years and no amount of out-of-touch, presidential spin will change that.

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