Won't somebody please think of the children?

Let's review the week that was, shall we?

Last Tuesday, GW Bush promised to break our addiction to foreign oil, "which is often imported from unstable parts of the world." He'd cut imports from the Middle East by 75 percent over the next twenty years.

He also lauded his "plan" to cut the deficit, expected to be around $360 billion dollars this year, in half by 2009. The plan doesn't include spending for Iraq, Afghanistan or hurricane reconstruction, but does rest on the assumption that his "temporary" tax cuts will be allowed to expire as planned.

Then he called on Congress to make them permanent, saying the cuts had "left 880 billion dollars in the hands of American workers, investors, small businesses, and families," by which he meant the highest earning executives, investors, big multinationals and really rich families like the Bushes.

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